Lomo and stuff...

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by eelakk, Jul 25, 2010.

  1. eelakk

    eelakk TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2010
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    US
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Can you use lomo film with a regular 35mm camera and still get the same result? Like coloring and stuff on the photo itself?
     
  2. PJL

    PJL TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2009
    Messages:
    418
    Likes Received:
    18
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    The whole "lomography" thing comes from the cheapness of the camera -- plastic lenses, light leaks, little (if any) aperture, shutter, or focus control, etc.
     
  3. Josh66

    Josh66 Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    14,604
    Likes Received:
    1,236
    Location:
    Cedar Hill, Texas
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    You can use Lomo film in any 35mm camera...

    It's basically film that is crappy on purpose. I have shot some Lomo Redscale film, and actually liked it... It's something different.
     
  4. Vautrin

    Vautrin No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2008
    Messages:
    927
    Likes Received:
    58
    Location:
    It changes
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    What do you mean by "lomo" film?

    As PJL mentioned, lomography cameras are actually crappy cameras from a technical perspective, with all kinds of "flaws" that a serious camera would avoid.

    But, many of us find these "flaws" provide an unpredictability to photos, and that aesthetically they can be quite pleasing.

    Below is an example of a lomo picture I took using a Holga camera using Kodak Ektar iso 100 120mm film

    [​IMG]

    Click to the actual image so you can see the details. There's a couple of things you'll notice:

    1. Around the edges the picture gets darker and eventually fades to black. This is called "vignetting" and is due to the fact that the lens doesn't let in enough light (and evenly through the film) to properly expose the film. It's a problem they probably solved close to a century ago
    2. The right side of the film (particularly the bottom right) has a reddish tint. This is due to the light leaks in the camera. They're actually quite unpredicatable -- i've had shots turn out green or yellow or other strange tints using daylight film shot in daylight.
    3. The image is quite soft and not sharp even though I correctly focused. Look closely at the lighthouse -- 120mm film is very roughly 3-4x the size of 35mm film around each of the edges, so the area is maybe a factor of 10 to 16 larger. This should translate into a tack sharp image -- and if you see a picture shot with a mamiya you'll see it immediately.

    Personally I think these "flaws" make what would have been otherwise a very plain photo of a lighthouse beautiful and aesthetically pleasing. That's just my opinion and you either love or hate the lomo thing.

    Lomographers do the following to encourage these "flaws" in their film:

    1. Shoot with a plastic camera. Plastic lenses won't be sharp and the things will leak light all over the place. Also since it's a cheap lens you'll get lots of vignetting
    2. Shoot with expired film. Old film can do funny things when developed
    3. Shoot with cross processing -- have film developed in different chemistries to change the feel of the film.
    4. Shoot wihtout a meter -- while SLRs have many settings in terms of exposure time and apererature, lomo cameras have only one -- which makes getting well exposed film a problem.

    Lomography brand film is just film Lomo sources from somewhere -- but it's not going to necessarily result in lomo type pictures if you shoot with, say, a Pentax...

    Keep in mind there are some lomo films out there like the redscale and the various rollei films like redbird and nightbird that are designed to react differently to light then normal film. These will produce strange results in a normal camera.

    The best advice I can give you is to pick up some film and shoot, shoot, shoot. See what you like and have fun with it...

    Oh, and the holga can be fun to pick up too. It's quite an entertaining little camera...
     
  5. Josh66

    Josh66 Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    14,604
    Likes Received:
    1,236
    Location:
    Cedar Hill, Texas
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Roll Film


    I thought that's what the OP was talking about...


    The only one I've ever actually used is the redscale one.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Those were taken in a 'normal' camera - a 1N RS.
     
  6. Josh66

    Josh66 Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    14,604
    Likes Received:
    1,236
    Location:
    Cedar Hill, Texas
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    The redscale film is just film that's loaded in the cassette backwards (so you shoot through the emulsion side). Even if it wasn't backwards, it's still not 'good' film. That blue streak going through the first one wouldn't be there if it was 'good' film just loaded backwards. I don't know what film they're using (can't really tell be looking at the negatives either). It's probably the same film they use for their 100 ISO color film, just loaded backwards.

    Redbird is something different... Not sure exactly how that works. I don't think it's loaded backwards though.
     
  7. Vautrin

    Vautrin No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2008
    Messages:
    927
    Likes Received:
    58
    Location:
    It changes
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    What exactly is "good" film?

    The film is neither "good" nor "bad" It's just created to different standards so it reacts to light differently and produces different colors and image qualities.

    The thing with lomography is you either love it or you hate it. The films used and the cameras used aren't "good" from a traditional perspective, but many people like the effects they have.

    Let me put it another way, Kodak E100 VS will give you some wacked out very saturated colors. People might appear sunburnt, for instance.

    Is the film bad? Not necessarily, some people love the saturation, and for some subject matters it looks good.

    The film is neither good or bad, it simply provides a medium for the photographer to make pictures with. The only thing the film does is set constraints for how the pictures will look after developing...
     
  8. Josh66

    Josh66 Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    14,604
    Likes Received:
    1,236
    Location:
    Cedar Hill, Texas
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    ...You know what I meant.

    That's why I put 'good' in quotes. I just meant that if it weren't loaded backwards (so that it would be a 'normal' color film), it wouldn't look like Fuji 160S, for example.

    It would still have 'defects'. I was just trying to point out that you don't have to have a 'crappy' camera to shoot 'crappy' film and still get 'crappy' results. Of course, a 'crappy' camera would probably help to exaggerate the 'crappiness' of the film.

    I hope you can read that without taking every word literally...
     
  9. guajero

    guajero TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    1
    Anything you can do with a Lomo you can do with a regular camera. When you do it with a regular camera is just costs less. Buy some old film and send it to the worst lab in town or buy super old slide film and cross process it.
     
  10. Vautrin

    Vautrin No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2008
    Messages:
    927
    Likes Received:
    58
    Location:
    It changes
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    depends on which one of their crazy cameras you're trying to take pictures like
     
  11. Josh66

    Josh66 Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    14,604
    Likes Received:
    1,236
    Location:
    Cedar Hill, Texas
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I saw that a while ago. Looks ... interesting, lol.

    A little cheaper on B&H:
    Lomography Spinner 360° Panoramic Camera 919 - B&H Photo
    LOL, 'rubber band drive'. I guess it could be fun to mess around with if you don't mind spending $130-200 on a 'toy'.
     
  12. Vautrin

    Vautrin No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2008
    Messages:
    927
    Likes Received:
    58
    Location:
    It changes
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    You know I think the thing with lomo stuff is nobody else makes it. Yes you could manufacture a similar pano camera for much cheaper but no one does itso lomo is king of the hilll
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
can you use lomography film in a normal camera
,

can you use lomography film in a regular 35mm camera

,
can you use lomography film regular camera
,
can you use normal film in a lomography camera
,
can you use regular film in a lomography camera
,
canon ae-1 lomography
,
lomo film in regular camera
,
lomography film in normal camera
,
using lomography film regular camera
,
what does lomo mean in photography