Lomography film camera?

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by eagleseyeview7, Jun 27, 2010.

  1. eagleseyeview7

    eagleseyeview7 TPF Noob!

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    I'm looking at getting into film and I have been looking at LC-A or Holgas. I have no idea what I am doing in film and I just want a lomography style camera for cheap. Does anyone have any suggestions on a camera? And I also would like to figure out what kind of format I would need, I'm not sure if 35mm or a medium format 120 would be better for me. I'm pretty clueless with film so any advice that you guys could give me would be awesome!

    Thank you!
     
  2. guitstik

    guitstik TPF Noob!

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    Boy, you are jumping in with both feet and pockets full of bowling balls. Why a lomo or even 120 film if you have no experience with film? I would start out, if you are serious about film, with and inexpensive 35mm camera. You can get a good quality 35mm cheap. I just bought a Mamiya/Sekor 500DTL for less than 20 bucks. Do a Google search and find out what to check for and how to operate any camera that you can find. I would suggest that, for now, stay away from programmable cameras like the Canon AE-1 program but instead get the plain AE-1. The Minolta X-700 would be good and can be had for about $50.00 or the X-370. These are all 80's model cameras and would probably have fewer problems than older models but do your home work. Fore warned is Fore armed.
     
  3. white

    white TPF Noob!

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    I agree 35 mm is best for starting out. You either have to process 120 yourself or have a specialty lab do it. I just don't think it makes financial sense to shoot 120 in a Holga and send it off to the lab, especially if you're just starting out. The 'shoot from the hip' novelty will wear off fast.

    Holga was one of my very first cameras. I got one because I wanted the light leaks and all the craziness associated with those toy cameras. I moved away from them eventually because I didn't have money to burn. And there are so many other cool cameras out there, anyway.
     
  4. eagleseyeview7

    eagleseyeview7 TPF Noob!

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    alright, thanks a lot I appreciate it. I want to get into film but i just had no idea what to get. where is the best place to find a cheap 35mm camera? ebay or amazon? or somewhere else?
     
  5. Josh66

    Josh66 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    What kind of digital equipment do you have?

    You most likely will be able to get a 35mm camera that uses the lenses you already have.

    That would be my suggestion...
     
  6. eagleseyeview7

    eagleseyeview7 TPF Noob!

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    I have a nikon d3000.
     
  7. guitstik

    guitstik TPF Noob!

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  8. Josh66

    Josh66 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I would also recommend KEH.com.

    For used stuff, they're hard to beat.

    Unless of course you find a steal at a garage sale/pawn shop, etc.
     
  9. PJL

    PJL TPF Noob!

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    I got all my 35mm cameras on craigslist, except for my Minolta. You can find really some really good deals. If you're looking for a specific model, adorama.com sells a lot of used film equipment, but you'll pay a premium v. some of the deals you can find on ebay or craigslist.
     
  10. kaiy

    kaiy TPF Noob!

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    If you want to try lo-fi photography, but are new to film, you should consider starting with a lo-fi 35mm film camera. Why?
    1. Lower cost of film. You get more frames per roll, and if you are a beginner, the way to get good at shooting with film, is to shoot lots of it. I find that when beginners use 120 film, it's higher costs and higher cost of processing keeps them from shooting because they are very much aware of how much each shot costs.

    2. Easier to find. 35mm film is much easier to find than the 120 film used in the Holga 120 cameras. I see it in the drugstores, as well as few grocery stores (although that is becoming a much rarer experience).

    3. Easier to get processed. Most drugstores and large big box stores like Target or Walmart still have 1-hour labs, but only for 35mm film. You will have to find a local lab to process your 120 film, or send it out.

    4. Lower cost of processing. It cheaper to get your 35mm film processed. If you skip the prints and just get the roll processed and put on CD, you can cut the cost down even more. Tip: If you want prints, then you only pay for the ones that came out. This keeps the cost of processing down.

    Take a look at one of these 35mm cameras:*
    Holga 135 or 135BC*
    Similar cheap lens and operation as the Holga 120 cameras. 1 aperture setting (yes, the camera has 2 settings, but they are identical), 2 shutter settings, N (1/100 sec) and B (Bulb setting) tripod mount, cable release socket If you want the corner vignetting like on the larger format camera, get the Holga 135BC.*

    Sample photos: Flickr: Holga 135BC / Holga 135

    Superheadz Black Slim Devil*
    This is a clone based on the popular vintage Vivitar Ultra Wide and Slim. It has no exposure controls and no flash option, but with it's wider than normal lens (22mm) it is capable of taking some outstanding photos.*

    Sample photos: There really isn't a good Flickr group for these cameras yet, so the sample photos are from the Vivitar UWS http://www.flickr.com/groups/57074580@N00*

    The Diana Mini*
    Lomography took the Diana camera, and shrunk it down to 35mm format. The Mini, while it lacks the interchangeable lenses of the full sized Lomography Diana+, is still a feature packed camera (at least compared to the Holga and Black Slim Devil). The frame format is unusual. They stuck with the square format of the Diana camera, but it is centered on a standard 35mm frame. The reason for floating the square on the 35mm frame is that be using a standard 35mm format, most 1-hour labs will be able to more easily deal with making scans or prints, since they are set up for regular 35mm film. You can also set the camera to half-frame 35mm, which is 2 vertical 24mm x 17mm images. This translates to 2 images on a standard 35mm frame. Currently a favorite of mine, it lives in my camera bag so it is handy where ever I go. 2 aperture settings, 2 shutter settings, N (1/100 sec) and B (Bulb setting) tripod mount, cable release socket This camera is unusual in that it offers square format,24x24mm on a standard 35mm frame (24x36mm). It also offers a half frame option, 17x24mm frames (it doubles the number of exposures you get on a roll of film)*

    Diana Mini sample photos: http://www.flickr.com/groups/1232275@N22*

    The Diana Mini is nice, but I find that unless I am working close and with a flash, the images tend to be on the softer focus side, to the point of being blurry. You might want to consider the sharper lens of the Superheadz Slim cameras (Black Slim Devil, White Slim Angel or other variant, all the same camera in diff colors). Take a careful look at the sample photos on Flickr to help you make a decision.

    Whichever camera you choose, remember that the point of lo-fi photography is to have fun and don't sweat the details!*

    For tips for lo-fi cameras, check out my website:*
    lo-fi photography - dianacamera.com - dianacamera.com

    For how-to videos for Holgas and Diana cameras, check out my youtube channel:*
    http://www.youtube.com/kaituba
     
  11. eagleseyeview7

    eagleseyeview7 TPF Noob!

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    thank you kaiy, that really helps. I have been looking around and the reason I really want to get into film is just to mess around and have fun. and I really wanted the holga lomography look. what I think I'm going to do is just get a holga 135 and another cheap 35mm like a pentax or vivitar or something so I can mess around with both.
     
  12. eagleseyeview7

    eagleseyeview7 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks everybody for your help! Guitstick, I just barely went out and bought a nikon N80 for $40 so i am pretty excited to start messing around with film.
     

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