Looking for a hiking backpack...

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by Solthar, Oct 9, 2008.

  1. Solthar

    Solthar TPF Noob!

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    Well, I'm searching for a hiking style backpack / camera bag that will hold all my gear (150-500mm / 17-50mm / camera, etc) AND my tripod. I'm not too worried about fast access. But a small amount of room to grow would be nice. My collection won't grow fast, but it WILL grow ;). Bonus if it can be considered a carry-on bag at airports.

    Barring that, I'm looking for a method of transporting a tripod without having to hold it, or have it constantly swinging into your side for hours on end. One that's compatible with backpacks.

    Any ideas or suggestions?
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Most good sized Lowepro backpack have a method for holding a tripod. I've got a Computrekker AW, which holds a good amount of gear and has a pocket/flap to hold a tripod. I usually prefer to carry my tripod in it's own bag though.
    If I were to buy another backpack style camera bag, I'd probably look at the Nature Trekker series. It's a more slim style, and the tripod attaches on the side. On thing I don't like about my Computrekker is how far is sits off of my back. I've taken mine all over the world as carry-on.
     
  3. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Personally, hiking would place comfort above all else. I'd first find a comfortable backpack (frame internal/external.. etc). Then find out how to fit your equipment in it. Perhaps individual lens cases inside or strapped to the outside.

    I have yet to see a backpack style camera bag that is suitable for serious hiking.
     
  4. Joves

    Joves No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I use the Camelback Ranger pack. I like the idea of having water with me all the time and, I just use straps to hold my tripod on it.
     
  5. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

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    Here's a list of makers and links I compiled for a different thread:



    Most of these makers do the full gamut of waist-bags, shoulder-bags, and back-packs - all for cameras. A few also do briefcase style. I hope this helps.


    Here's something that's kinda interesting too:
    http://www.canogacamera.com/SearchResult.aspx?CategoryID=7430
    Camera Armor! :D
    .
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2008
  6. sambrody44

    sambrody44 TPF Noob!

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    I got the Lowepro Flipside 200 for hiking, it's pretty good but doesn't leave much room for anything other then camera gear. But thats the case with most camera back packs.
     
  7. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    Osprey and Arcteryx are generally regarded as the "best" pack manufacturers. Osprey is known for making obscenely comfortable packs (though you pay a little bit of a price in weight). Arcteryx is known for making extremely rugged, somewhat stripped-down packs, though some people complain that if they don't fit your particular body type then they aren't comfortable. When they do, they're great.

    That said, any pack above 3500 cubic inches with some upward expansion capability should be able to hold a relatively large tripod inside.

    Those two brands, however, are quite expensive. If you need a rugged, used pack, look for an old Dana Designs pack. Lowe Alpine is cheap for a reason...their internal frames and suspension systems absolutely blow.

    Don't forget a rain-fly, since you have valuable gear inside. An alternative, though, that I think is much better, is to buy a dry-bag, put your gear inside it, and then put the dry-bag inside the pack. You'll sacrifice side-access but it's well worth it. I've fallen into rivers, creeks, and hiked through torrential downpours with a dry bag in my pack, and what do you know, all my stuff stayed dry.
     
  8. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    If you talk of proper hiking, there is nothing much else than Bergans of Norway. Very comfy, great for carrying heavy loads of more than 1/3 of your body weight, very hard to destroy (I tried hard already ;) ).

    But I would guess you do not plan expeditions, then some cheaper or more fashion-like brands will have useful ones as well.
     
  9. Solthar

    Solthar TPF Noob!

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    Heh, no expiditions... yet ;). My main problem in selecting a pack is that usually the descriptions offer little insight as to if the bag has a method of attatching a tripod.

    So far I've found National Geographic has some nice, if a bit large, options in the ~ $200 price range.

    Tripod holder, and able to fit a ~10 inch lens, camera, etc? Rather tought to find.

    Oh, and thanks for that list, Bifurcator, Still going over the links - quite a few there!
     
  10. DavidTK

    DavidTK TPF Noob!

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    If you're going to hike more than a few hours, then there's no substitute for a hiking backpack, such as an Osprey. Even the best camera backpacks are severely lacking in comfort for long hikes compared to a proper hiking pack, which keep your back cooler, have more adjustments, and a much better waist strap. It's more trouble getting gear in and out, but it will fit everything.

    I don't put my tripod in my hiking pack. I attach it to the outside on the bottom, horizontally.
     
  11. asiadrabik

    asiadrabik TPF Noob!

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    I got the Lowepro Flipside 200 ,I agree that is quite small ,but you can fit your 150-500mm lenses ,camera and one more lenses.It has aside 2 pockets .Tjhe true is that you can put anything else in it ,but for short trips it is excellent and it is very comfortable to carry .
     

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