Looking for a SLR, which one?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by shibabigk, Apr 16, 2007.

  1. shibabigk

    shibabigk TPF Noob!

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    I am looking for a afordable high quality SLr. I am not lookin got do any fancy stuff just good old fashioned pphotography. i am not the type that will sta yout all night because there is a full moon and the lighting effects will be fantastic. I leave that up to the more talented, creative people ;-)
    I need soemthing to take landscape, portraits and especially pet photos with. Movement& zoom is important wide landscapes not as much.
    I am also debating wether I should go digital. I know long term they are more afordable but i am still a little hestitant. in my experience if you use old fashioed film you take fewer but better planned pictures. I usually end up with 30 good pics wether I have 36 on ngeatives or 100 on a CD.

    Any input would be wonderful!
     
  2. blackdoglab

    blackdoglab yeah I'm easy.... but I'm not cheap

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    Go with a used 35mm body and lens. Any Pentax Kmount body and lenses will do will and there are plenty out there. If you want something a wee bit more advanced, try an Olympus om-10.
     
  3. Frequent Traveler

    Frequent Traveler TPF Noob!

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    Well, there is much more to discuss for digital slr's (dslr).

    However, for film cameras everyone will have a brand preference. As mentioned, Pentax is certainly excellent, Olympus made some fine cameras too, Nikon is not to be left out, Minolta is my personal favorite (nothing like Minolta colors and sharpness!!!), Leica is OK, ;-) and well, Canon, i guess we can't forget those guys....


    Lotsa options and most of the film cams can be had for under $50 with GOOD glass if you shop well.

    Enjoy- Viva la film!!!

    frank
     
  4. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    Hehe.. An Olympus OM-10 is more advanced than any Pentax body? :raisedbrow:

    I'm glad to see someone still referring to an SLR and meaning film. As for whether you go for film or digital... well, right now film cameras are dropping to really low prices. Digital SLRs are becoming more affordable too but still nowhere near as cheap. I don't personally think digital is necessarily more affordable in the long run; that depends on how much you shoot, how much you print, how much you spend on various accessories, computer software and hardware, or how much you spend on film and darkroom equipment or processing, and how often you buy new camera bodies. Also the 'taking better pictures' argument is debatable too; after all if you want to be more selective with digital you could simply not take so many photos ;) Basically the film vs digital question is one of preference; of which you feel gives you more control, and which workflow you prefer.

    Since you say you don't want anything fancy and you want 'old fashioned photography', blackdoglab is giving good advice: for affordable good quality gear look at an older, manual focus SLR system from Pentax, Olympus, Nikon, Canon, Minolta or various other companies. Or you could go for an autofocus sytem, which will allow compatibility with a digital SLR should you decide to go digital, in which case look at Nikon, Canon (EOS), Pentax or Minolta (Dynax/Maxxum). As for the purposes of the camera that you mentioned, well that's really more an issue of lenses rather than cameras. Sorry I can't be more specific but there is nearly infinite choice for what you're looking for.
     
  5. blackdoglab

    blackdoglab yeah I'm easy.... but I'm not cheap

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    O.K., more advanced than the basic k1000, except that it needs a manual adapter for full control. I'm slightly nostolgic about mine.
     
  6. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    The OM's were great. Olympus really knew how to design a camera - the XA/XA2 are IMO one of the greatest designs of any camera, in fact of any anything. And one day I need to get my hands on an OM4...
    :drool:

    ... er anyway, resume topic... personally I think that even if you do decide to go digital it would almost be madness not to also take advantage of the current price of 35mm gear. But then as you can probably tell, I'm all about collecting photographic gear as well as using it... I'm never going to buy into the 'camera is just a tool' thing ;)
     
  7. YoungPic

    YoungPic TPF Noob!

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    personally go with a 35 mm film camera and upgrade later becuase i find you learn more with film, with digital you sometimes have the urge just to snap away
     
  8. Mad_Gnome

    Mad_Gnome TPF Noob!

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    I'm with Traveler in being partial to Minolta. Any of the major brands would serve you in good stead, however. My recommendation, however, is to pick a model that's not the one everybody else is going for. You can save some money this way while still getting quality equipment. With Minolta, for instance, look for an XD-series camera rather than the X-700 and X-570 everyone seems to be fighting over like starving wolves.
     
  9. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    The XD and XE series - well they were good enough for Leica! The SRT series are very nice too. I don't even need to mention the Rokkor glass.
     
  10. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I don't think you would go wrong with a Minolta. I don't know how much to read into your post, but I would guess you would be happiest with an SRT 201/202. I had the 101 ages ago but you probably want flash sync ;).

    Start here... http://www.photoethnography.com/ClassicCameras/index-frameset.html?MinoltaSRT101.html~mainFrame

    I'm not saying that this will be the best camera in the world (you won't be able to tell from the prints though), but you don't need the best wife in the world to love her right? And you will love one of these! Good luck!

    mike
     
  11. airgunr

    airgunr TPF Noob!

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    One thing to consider in purchasing a camera is you are purchasing a "System" not just the camera but lenses as well.

    Some older cameras will not use the newer lenses from the same manufacturer. Canon is one that does this. The older AE-1 ( and excellent camera) uses the FD mount lenses but the newer cameras like the XT will not use the same lenses.

    That is the main reason I chose Nikon. All of my newer Nikon lenses (except the G and DX series) will work with my F5, FM2n or FE2 film cameras as well as any of the newest Digital SLR's from Nikon.

    There are other manufacturers that maintain the same compatablility but I'm not sure which ones they are. Just keep that in the back of your mind when you are shopping for a camera.

    That being said, I like the Nikon FM2n, FE2 or FA cameras for manual. The Canon AE-1 series is good as well except for the compatablity issue. I've not used any others but Pentax, Minolta, etc all have excellent manual film cameras.
     
  12. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    airgunr, are you sure the old manual focus Nikon lenses will work on any of the new dSLRs? I was under the impression that they would work on the D200 and other high-end models, but not on the lower range ones up to and including the D80... of course I could be wrong there.
     

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