looking for polarizer filter, question about brand quality

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by rasheemo, Aug 13, 2008.

  1. rasheemo

    rasheemo TPF Noob!

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    for my kit lens i bought a pack that included a UV and circular polarizer for 20 bucks.

    now i plan on buying the sigma 17-70 and a GOOD polarizer but there are so many brands that i don't know where the value is and where unnecessary quality is.

    How is tiffen in quality compared to B + W and heliopan?

    specifically tiffen and Hoya, since they're the same price (for a 72mm CP)

    thanks again guys
     
  2. rasheemo

    rasheemo TPF Noob!

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    bump.

    and what about thin versions? they are much more expensive but are they worth it?
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The thin filters are for very wide lenses...or any lens where a think filter would cause vignetting. Each lens is different...but I think you will be OK with a regular filter, as long as you don't stack them.

    As for brands and models and price levels. I don't fully understand it either. Some are more expensive because they have a good brand name like B&W...but a good brand name is more likely to have a good quality product. My usually theory on this is that if I don't want to spend the money for the very best, I'll look for something that is less expensive than the highest priced models but not the cheapest ones either.
     
  4. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Tiffen and Hoya both make good filters in their higher-end, coated lines. B+W is (IMO) a step up from them, and Heliopan, well... are you prepared to sacrifice your first born? I don't know for sure, but I suspect with a 17mm wide end, you're going to want a slim filter to avoid vignetting. The disadvantage of those of course is that they can't accept a lens cap or additional filters. On the plus side, the B+W slim C-POL comes with it's own lens cap.
     
  5. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    You really have to investigate each filter. You'll hear people advise that B+W are top of the line, but it's been pointed out to me that some of their filters use the same glass/plastic lamination that is considered poor quality when the label says Tiffen. I've used all of the brands, and most of the time I can't tell any difference. These days I buy Hoya; the price is right and the quality is excellent. Rumor has it that Nikon brand filters are made by Hoya.
     
  6. Steph

    Steph No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I am with Mike on that one. Given the price of good quality polarisers it is going to be difficult to find someone with experience of them all. Avoid the cheapest ones and you should be fine. You might not see any difference between the very best and less expensive filters anyway. Buy what you can afford. As for the thinner filters, it is a very good idea to consider those if you use very wide lenses.
     
  7. rasheemo

    rasheemo TPF Noob!

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    well its 17mm on 1.6x crop body (does the crop make a difference in this case?)

    i think im going with Hoya, i doubt i'll have a problem. i think im passing on a UV filter... i hope i dont regret it though

    thanks again guys! =]

    while we're at it i wanted to upgrade my tripod to this:

    Bogen - Manfrotto 718B Compact Digi Tripod with 3-Way Head & Carry Case

    my current tripod is clunky and cost 20 bucks haha. any thoughts on the upgrade? thanks again.
     
  8. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I like B+W. They're good quality. The cheapest place that's legit that I know to get them from is www.hvstar.net . What's the filter size for that lens? It should say on the lens itself.
     
  9. rasheemo

    rasheemo TPF Noob!

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    pretty cheap site, although i needed to purchase the lens and tripod (see previous post) so i went with adorama and snagged the hoya CP for about 65 bucks.
     
  10. dhilberg

    dhilberg TPF Noob!

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    I've always bought Hoya filters, except for my Tiffen 0.6 ND Grad filter. They make more optical glass than anyone and the quality is great. Spend a little more and get one that's multicoated to prevent flares and ghosting.

    On the wide end of your 17-70 zoom you'll probably get vignetting with a regular size filter like my Nikkor 18-200 does. I opted for the Hoya Pro 1 D's since they have filter threads on the front. Most thin mounts don't.

    I've also heard the rumor that Hoya makes filters for Nikon. Ken Rockwell says on his site that everyone, including Nikon, Canon and Leica come knocking on Hoya's door when they have special glass needs. Not sure if that's true or not but it wouldn't surprise me.

    Ken Rockwell has some great information on filters:
    http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/filters.htm

    All about Hoya:
    http://www.kenrockwell.com/hoya/filters.htm
     

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