Looking for upgrade but confused;)

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by mkaslam, Sep 24, 2008.

  1. mkaslam

    mkaslam TPF Noob!

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    Hi
    I started taking some photography courses this year and bought my first DSLR in January which is Canon Rebel XTi and got 3 lenses with it.
    1) 18-55mm (Kit Lense)
    2) 50 mm 2.8f
    3) 70-300mm
    I am thinking of getting into wedding photography but i dont know why i think i should upgrade to a new technology but really confused because sometimes i think that insted of getting a new camera why dont i spend in a good lense.
    What would you suggest?
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    For wedding photography, you will really want some good lenses...I would certainly say that lenses are more important than the camera itself.
    Of course, if you are going to be doing wedding photography, you will need backup equipment anyway, so you will need at least one more camera and I'd suggest upgrading and using your XTi as a backup or 2nd camera.

    A basic wedding kit should include a 'fast' normal range lens. On that camera, that is about 17mm to 50mm with a max aperture of F2.8. The best option is probably the Canon EF-S 17-55mm F2.8 IS, but you could save some money by going with something like the Tamron 17-50mm F2.8.
    Your shooting style will dictate what other lenses you will need/want. The 70-200 F2.8 L IS, is a lens that most pro wedding shooters have.
    A fast prime might also be a good idea, the 50mm F1.4 is a good option but there are many good ones to choose from: 85mm F1.8, 35mm F1.4 L etc.
    Some wedding shooters also carry a macro lens for detail shots and a wide angle lens. I really like my 10-22mm lens for wide shots.
    There is plenty of other gear that many wedding photographers will say is essential.

    As you can see, it's not cheap to 'get into' wedding photography. If you can't afford this type of equipment, then I'd suggest assisting another photographer to gain experience (and maybe pay) until you do have adequate equipment and knowledge to shoot weddings on your own (or as the primary with your own assistant/2nd shooter.)
     
  3. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    And unless all your weddings are outside, you'll need a flash.
     
  4. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Good lenses stay with you
    Good bodies last only till the next model comes out (which can be under a year sometimes).

    Best in the early days to invest in building up a good strong collection of lenses - flahses, tripods and other things so as to get the most out of your camera - the body is just the recorder so it is the least important item for upgrading.

    As well a good lenses and a flash you will also need a diffuser for your flash. Since you have a 50mm f2.8 already I would say go for the flash next then go from there with getting lenses
     
  5. zandman

    zandman TPF Noob!

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    i tried to do this, and didn't get anywhere because of the camera i have.
    if you will apply on a wedding photography studio, a big one, they will require you to have atleast 20d, d200.
     
  6. TamiyaGuy

    TamiyaGuy No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    In my opinion, lenses always help, but the deciding factor is simply your knowledge, so practice. Then practise some more. And then some more. Perhaps a little more for good luck.

    Seriously, decent lenses can be a good part of your kit bag, but they are useless if you have no idea what they are good/bad for (that's not to say that you are like that). Likewise, you can do professional photography with simply your camera and its kit lens, they just might not come out as well in terms of image quality as the same photo taken with $5,000 worth of kit (but then again, if the clients are happy with it...).

    All I'm saying is that you shouldn't go and splash out on kit hoping that it will make you a better photographer.

    However, a good choice is a long-range, fast aperture telephoto zoom lens, like a 70-200 f/2.8. Most wedding couples don't like a photographer constantly being 2 feet away from them ;). Having a decent flash (and, of course, the knowledge on how to use that flash) helps for indoors shots as well. Finally, a very wide-aperture prime lens, the most common example being the 50mm f/1.8, is also a very good choice.

    Don't be afraid to buy third-party lenses, either (e.g. Sigma, Tamron, etc), just make absolutely sure that everything works the way you want it to before buying. Take test shots and view them on the computer for any abnormalities (e.g. autofocus inaccuracy, softness, etc).

    Best of luck! It's a dog-eat-dog world out there :D.
     
  7. petercox

    petercox TPF Noob!

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    If you want to get into wedding photography, first and foremost you need to learn how to use your camera. With the lenses and body you have, I could shoot a wedding start to finish and get fine results. I would need a flash, but other than that it would work.

    I would spend the money you plan to spend on your gear to get some one-to-one (or small group) time with someone who is willing to teach you how to use it. You'll get far more bang for your buck that way. I know you're taking a course at the minute - but if you're feeling confused you may not be getting the most out of it.

    I often have people come to me who are in the middle of an adult education college course. They weren't able to keep up with the rest of the class and as a result are foundering. They spend a couple of days with me which catches them up, and they can proceed and get the full benefit.

    Then, when you're familiar with the gear and can get acceptable results from it, upgrade your lenses first - starting with the one you feel you'll use most. As has been pointed out - bodies come and go, but lenses are for life.

    Cheers,
    Peter
     
  8. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Absolutely excellent advice Peter, well said!
     

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