Looking to use tripod for stop animation

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by TwiceTown, May 23, 2011.

  1. TwiceTown
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    TwiceTown New Member

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    A friend and I are planning to try our hand at stop animation for fun and wanted to get some recommendations on a tripod set that has really good, solid lockup. I know stop animation is slightly outside of the regular expertise of the forum. But I figured the lockup part was universal. Light weight would not be an issue since this will mainly be used for animation so something beefy would be good. Any recommendations? Thanks forum.
  2. oldmacman
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    oldmacman New Member

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    I have four manfrotto tripods all with the same plate. It makes leaving the plate easier. All are solid construction and the most recent unit is the lower priced M-Y 7301YB model (about $120 Canadian)
  3. TwiceTown
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    TwiceTown New Member

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    Thanks, I'll check it out. Ever try those Manfrotto geared, locking heads?
  4. Overread
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    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member

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    For a regular DSLR setup I'd say a Manfrotto Junior Geared head would be essential for this kind of slow, precise shooting. I use one for my macro work, where it is invaluable - slower to work with than many others, but the fine controls and lack of any drooping make it worth its cost. Heavier versions of course offer more stability, but are more aimed at heavier setups than a regular DSLR and macro lens would give - for most applications the Junior is enough.

    Also keep an eye on the floor your working on. Vinals or carpets are a nightmare since they'll move under the tripod as you move around - concrete or stone is best (wood might work, but can also be susceptible to shifting).
  5. TwiceTown
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    TwiceTown New Member

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    Great tips, thanks. We'll be using my Canon 60d with battery grip and a mix of lenses including a 70-200 f2.8, the heaviest, with extension tubes for close up and LED panels for lighting. I'll post some examples once we get going.

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