Macro for Portraits

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by sdgmusic, Apr 21, 2008.

  1. sdgmusic

    sdgmusic TPF Noob!

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    I hear that macro lenses can make great portrait lenses.

    so here's my question

    50mm 2.8 Macro
    OR
    100mm 2.8 Macro

    using a DSLR w/APS-C sensor
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    What ever focal length would be more comfortable for you. It doesn't really matter.
     
  3. sdgmusic

    sdgmusic TPF Noob!

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    I am thinking 50 just because it would be a more versatile lens. do you agree?
     
  4. brileyphotog

    brileyphotog TPF Noob!

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    I don't know where you heard that. Macro lenses are good for taking pictures of things that are tiny because they usually have a very short minimum focus distance. Portraits are usually shot in the 80-120mm range (at least that's what I prefer). Some lenses can do both well but they do not entail each other.

    Also, are you looking at a fixed macro lens? Why not something with zoom?I've got the 28-70mm/f2.8 MACRO Sigma and I love it.
     
  5. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Macros are optimised to be sharpest at their nearest focusing point. My Nikon 80-200 f/2.8 comes up much sharper than my MicroNikkor 105mm f/2.8 in every test I have ever seen, but that is focusing on a resolution target quite some distance from the lens. However once you start focusing closer than 6-8m it becomes very very soft.

    Now again that's not a universal rule. I have other lenses which do just fine at their nearest focusing distance and are not quite as good at infinity regardless of being a macro or not.
     

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