Macros from SF / C&C Welcome

Discussion in 'General Gallery' started by Kyuss, Jul 26, 2008.

  1. Kyuss

    Kyuss TPF Noob!

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    Hello everyone,

    I got a new lens today. The Tamron 90mm 2.8 DI.

    Loving it! This is my first Macro lens and I think I did ok with it today. Didn't have as much light as I wanted so that I could have stopped down more, but oh well.... That will have to wait until I get a flash!

    Here we go.

    1)

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    2)


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    3)

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    4)

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    5)

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    6)

    This one, not my fav....but look at the bottom...I think those are Mosquito larve!
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    7)

    Not Macros obviously, just playing with the new lens!
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    8)

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2008
  2. Computer_Generated

    Computer_Generated TPF Noob!

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    excellent! I think macro is my next lens. What's #4 of btw? It looks awesome!
     
  3. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Nice work - a macro lens is a great addition to any photographer's gadget bag. You've got some good images here, and you seem to have already nearly mastered one of the two most difficult aspects of macro work; lighting. Your exposures are very good.

    The focus needs a little work however. Think of this as a case of "Less is more" That is, less close to the subject, more focus. I'll use #2 as an example. You've got the butterfly's right wing, head and most of the flower in sharp focus good. The left wing however is very soft. An all too common mistake with macro work is that of trying to get too close to the subject, so that it fills the viewfinder. As you see, in macro work, we're dealing with very shallow depths of field; try backing away from the subject to gain important DoF and then cropping to the subject. This will give you the same image in the end, but with much more area in focus.
     
  4. Kyuss

    Kyuss TPF Noob!

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    Thanks! I have no idea what type of butterfly it is. Sorry.


    Thanks for the tip. I was sorta trying to figure that out yesterday and totally understand what your saying. I'll keep it mind for the next photos!
     
  5. Kyuss

    Kyuss TPF Noob!

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    Here a few more from that day.

    1)

    [​IMG]

    2)

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    3)

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    Thanks for looking.
     
  6. icassell

    icassell TPF Noob!

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    Very nice! Welcome to the wonderful world of macro! Lighting is oh-so-important -- you're going to want lots of it because you want to be running at f11 or more to get sufficient DOF on the little critters. I love your ladybug.
     
  7. Wyjid

    Wyjid TPF Noob!

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    Greater DOF is not always needed. one of the real tricks to macro is focal plane. you can get real close to your subject if you can find a focal plane that focuses on it evenly. butterfly is a good example. the angle your shoot at obviously was not creating a focal plane that runs parallel to the wing. instead it crosses it. if you can pay attention to the way the plane interacts with the subject, you can take great macros at lower F stops. this means more natural lighting, and crisper images if you can keep your F stops to mid range settings instead of high ones.
     
  8. niforpix

    niforpix TPF Noob!

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    Awesome shots! I love the colours!
     

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