Makeshift Lighting

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by bogleric, Dec 15, 2004.

  1. bogleric

    bogleric TPF Noob!

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    Ok, So i have my backdrop now from ebay. Only $35 instead of $400 what a deal. Decent quality and so far no complaints. Since I don't normally do a studio type shoot as my focus is ususally the outdoors and outdoor events I don't have the standard lighting. Therefore I am looking for ways to create some good light without buying the special stuff.

    I thought about halogen work lights but I don't think thos will quite work. I have 3 of them and could eliminate shadows, but I think they will be either too bright or wack out the colors even with a custom white balance. Although it could work. I would really appreciate your thoughts.
     
  2. rangefinder

    rangefinder TPF Noob!

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    Been reading in other forums where people are using shop lights from sears and home depot, successfully. A lot cheaper than a new set of mono-lights.
     
  3. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    To use lights successfully you have to understand light. If you know how light works then you can use anything. A grat Ad photographer I used to know once lit a studio shot with torches. It won an award!
     
  4. doxx

    doxx TPF Noob!

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    brighten up shadows etc. is not a problem, since one can solve that
    visually (think reflectors, fill light etc).

    The main deal is color temperature - different light sources have a
    certain color temperature (measured in Kelvin) and produce a
    different color cast that shows on color film and digital sensors.

    Most common color films/digital camera sensors are optimized for
    daylight (around 5500k) - any other light source will throw off the
    color balance.

    With a digital camera you can simply change the white balance,
    with color film you'll need to use a film that is optimized for the light
    source or use compensating filters.

    key is to use lights with a similar color temperature to get decent
    results. hope this helps
     

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