Model Release

Discussion in 'General Shop Talk' started by RRose, Oct 3, 2006.

  1. RRose

    RRose TPF Noob!

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    I'm really not in business yet, but may try when I retire from my job. I avoid taking pictures of people because if by offchance I may sell a picture, I have no knowledge of when model releases are necessary. Any help would be appreciated.

    RRose
     
  2. DeepSpring

    DeepSpring TPF Noob!

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    Don't take my word on it but I think just for advertisements

    Someone else will know better than I
     
  3. JDP

    JDP TPF Noob!

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    "[FONT=helvetica,arial,tahoma,verdana][SIZE=-1] Following industry standards, for any work that will appear in consumer or trade magazines, newspapers, or educational books, you generally do not need a model release. This is also true for photographic exhibits. These are considered educational/informational uses.[/SIZE][/FONT][FONT=helvetica,arial,tahoma,verdana][SIZE=-1]However, for photos that will be used in commercial applications - ads, brochures, posters, greeting cards, catalogs, postcards, kiosks, trade shows, Web sites, etc. - you will need a release from your subject in order to be "legal."[/SIZE][/FONT]
    [FONT=helvetica,arial,tahoma,verdana][SIZE=-1]Some ask: "If you sell a photograph to a newspaper, is it now considered a commercial use since there was commercial gain?" or, "If you sell a print from an exhibit, is that commercial gain?" In theory, no. In practice, my photojournalist friends do not get releases; and my colleagues in the general editorial and fine art genres don't get releases very often, either."[/SIZE][/FONT]


    [FONT=helvetica,arial,tahoma,verdana][SIZE=-1]From BetterPhoto.Com
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  4. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    In an editorial scenario get their name and number and let them know that the shot may or may not appear in editorial or personal work. Not easy, but you should make a strong effort. You own the image and if they have a problem with that they should speak up now. I have found that people rarely have a problem as long as everything is up front and clear.

    Commercially the shot is a lot more controlled in that models sign to get on to the project.
     

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