models

Discussion in 'Graphics Programs and Photo Gallery' started by christopher, Mar 9, 2004.

  1. christopher

    christopher TPF Noob!

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    I plan on experimenting at the studio in school, they have most everything to do with photography and it's at my disposal. I can also use these shots in my portfolio. I want to do some model stuff, just experimenting but I was wondering what advice anyone had at all for this. This'll be studio stuff, and I want to do black and white we are both fooling around, looking for something neat to get a shot of. and How do I use a polaroid camera? I'm sure someone at school would help, but i like you guys better.

    thanks again, for all the how-to junk i'm posting.
     
  2. Dew

    Dew TPF Noob!

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    when u say "model" ... i presume your talking about a human subject?

    i think the biggest mistake people make with using a studio setting is their lighting or lack thereof ... and most of the time its too much or too close or the position of the lighting is not best

    if one doesnt have a flash meter, i think a digital camera or polaroid is ideal to check your settings ... keeping in mind that most cameras flash sync up to 1/125-1/150 ... depending on the color range of the subject ... the aperture would have to be a little high ... from f8-f20

    if you're using continuos light or reflectors bouncing natural light from the windows is great also ... that way u dont have to deal with flash (especially if ur not familiar with it)

    but if you're new to studio, i would do a lot of testing, write your settings down and iso
     
  3. christopher

    christopher TPF Noob!

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    awesome, thanks!
    I'll keep the lighting in mind, and yes I am talking about a human model.
    I've book studio time, and my friend is able to bring a change of clothes and hopefully I'll be able to have an assistant there to help and do my friends make up and junk.
    are you familiar with fashion photography? I've taken a liking to it and was wondering if anyone has done any? mmm good looking ladies. ;)
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    That's good advice from Dew, try to write down your settings for each shot. It might also be helpful to sketch out your lighting set up so that you can compare the photos with how you had the lights set up.

    I have been doing a lot of reading about studio lighting and it's overwhelming. It can be quite simple and it can be very complicated.

    Do a search for portrait/studio/model lighting etc. There is a wealth of informations. At the very least, get some ideas of what you want to try when you are in the studio so that you don't waste time sitting around trying to think of stuff when you're actually in the studio.

    Good luck & have fun.
     
  5. christopher

    christopher TPF Noob!

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    thanks for the tips, I was also wondering what kind of routine you followed when you are taking photos of models. Banter wise and such, since I know my friend (obviously) I can make her laugh easily, but I was curious of people you don't know.
     
  6. Dew

    Dew TPF Noob!

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    i usually dont make my models laugh ... i "direct" them to how i want them to look, usually attitude if its beauty/fashion ... for portraits, i use whatever their passion is ... i use a scenario to evoke emotion out of them ...
     

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