Modern / traditional / children.

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Lensmeister, Jun 26, 2005.

  1. Lensmeister

    Lensmeister TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 1, 2005
    Messages:
    1,488
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this EN
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Ok I hope this doesn't get too many people too angry, as I want to gauge people opinion as to their feeling on this subject.

    With the advent of the super-duper cameras we have on the market now do people think that the traditional methods are lost on the youth of today or the 'art' of photogrpahy.

    Let me explain a bit more.

    Yesterday I bought a Canon EOS 500 Quartz Date back for my son (aged 7) to borrow (See the post called what a bargin). Now this camera has Autofocus, auto exposure, all the Canon pic modes. Now had I had my old Centon DF300 returned (Manual focus, etc.) I would have given that to him.

    Then he'd have learned about the f-stops, the shutter speeds etc. But the Canon is so much easier for me to show him things as I would show him me using the EOS 10 etc. I intend to show him shutter speeds et al.

    But with the newer all singing all dancing digital cameras will they loose that excitment for the prints turning up, when they can easily look at a pic and delete it and move on.


    Will these newer digital cameras make kids lose the 'art of photography'?
     
  2. Artemis

    Artemis Just Punked Himself

    Joined:
    May 16, 2004
    Messages:
    5,313
    Likes Received:
    43
    Location:
    England! w000t!
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Yes....I guess...but the pics will never be that good as the old ones....like cartier bresson! :D I KNOW SOMEONE OLD WHO DID PHOTOGRAPHY! Photographer teacher eat your heart out...
     
  3. KevinR

    KevinR TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2005
    Messages:
    1,204
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Dearborn, MI
    Well yes and no. I let my 5yr old daughter mess around with our Canon S30. She has a very keen eye with composition, and with the immediate play back, she gets to see that. It only encourages her to take more. But she also gets to see me in the darkroom. She gets that side of it too. I figure I will wait till she gets older to start her on the technical aspects of photography. Right now, she is just enjoying the idea of taking pictures without the worries of technical limitations.
     
  4. EmergentFungus

    EmergentFungus TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'll agree with that. All the other kids at my school think the best cameras are the tiniest digital ones with catchy names. They all use them on full auto despite the custom settings and they simply love digital zoom as it allows them to save that precious energy walking closer to the subject. Main attraction to digital seems to be the ease of use and the ability to email pictures.

    I myself have a Powershot S50 which I've been using for a while. In the last couple of weeks I dug out my (late) dad's Canon Elan SLR so I could experiment with it. Loving every moment with it.

    It's a dieing art, but one which I aim to learn about.
     
  5. mentos_007

    mentos_007 The Freshmaker!

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2004
    Messages:
    9,325
    Likes Received:
    102
    Location:
    Poland, Sz-n
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I am afraid that there would be much less beautifull pictures, simply because people will stop thinking before taking a picture. Sometimes we have a very short moment to take a photograph and we won't be able to retake it. Then we realize that we used auto mode which overexposed or spoiled the whole photograph. With film cameras, all manual - like old but good Zenit - people spent more time thinking before pressing the button and the pictures were better, it was visible that photographer put an effort to take it.
    A few days back I met my 9 yr old cousin who has never played with film camera - he is "fully" digital. He has a talent to photography, he sees things a bit diferently than other people, and he is really good at basic composition and so on... but... when I showed him my Zenit... he asked me where's the ON/OFF button...
    A week ago I heard a guy complaining that his son takes pictures with DSLR on manual mode becuase it took him to long to set all the settings and the "models" (his eldery aunt) got bored waiting...
    But on the other hand... there are kidds really interested in photography, and there are courses where using digitals or auto cams is not allowed. There are a few kids interested in darkroom and so on... I hope that will never die.
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    Messages:
    7,021
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Photography as art was weakened upon the introduction of film. It was killed when roll film came along, and buried with 35mm film and an econo-lab on every corner.

    Real photographers only use large format view cameras and hand coated glass plates.

    I'm just kidding of course. :) With every new increase in technology there has always been a worry that somehow it will destroy photography as art. It hasn't happened yet.
     
  7. danalec99

    danalec99 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2004
    Messages:
    8,345
    Likes Received:
    68
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    There have always been point and shooters and the new 'advanced' cameras will generate even more of them. But I do not see how it can kill the medium. If your son is seriously bitten by the bug, no motor driven turbo charged automation in this world will stop him from experimenting with aperture and shutter speed.
     
  8. tempra

    tempra TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2005
    Messages:
    1,669
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Oxford, UK
    Look at it this way, anyone can take a photograph, but photographs that are remembered, acclaimed and hung in peoples toilets are the good ones, and in general these are thought through and taken with a purpose - although some of the best ones in my opinion are of the moment, but then the photographer is there in order to capture that moment whatever it may be.

    Not all people with a camera take an interest in photography, they see it as a means of recording what they did and who was there and thats that. People who want to take it to the next level will experiment with apertures and ISO and shutter speed etc. so I don't think it'll be lost at all, it wasn't lost when the fixed lens compacts came out which are effectively the same as the cheap digitals that are out nowadays.
     
  9. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    Messages:
    7,021
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I think there is plenty of evidence that some, possibly many famous photographers didn't know much about the technical side of photography.

    Diane Arbus is a big favorite of mine. The more I learn about her, and view her work that isn't her top 10 most famous pics, the more I realize that I know a lot more about the technical side of photography than she ever did. I recently saw the Diane Arbus show "Family Album". It was sort of crushing and inspiring at the same time to be able to see these prints and contact sheets. Some were fabulous, others were uninspired, with crappy lighting and printing. Much of the show had fixer damage. I watched a video there that was narrated by someone else, but in Diane Arbus' words. She talked about how what was important to her was interacting with her subjects, and that she neglected the technical side.

    Ansel Adams, now there's a technical guy!
     
  10. lazarus219

    lazarus219 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2004
    Messages:
    215
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Port Macquarie
    I think there will always be snapshooters and photographers, the line is just becoming less defined because people have access to the photographers 'tools',
    most people with an advanced point and shoot will never touch manual, unless just out of testing, and they will not understand the setting to change them.

    I dont think digital will bring through a bunch of new wannabe (bad word for it) photographers, but people may decide it seems like a good thing and learn more about it, which leaves them being like everyone else here,

    i think there will always be a distinction between photog and the people that just take pictures
     
  11. DaphneOracle

    DaphneOracle TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2005
    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Eastern Shore, Alabama
    I think you hit it on the head Mentos. Point and shoot is just that. When one slows a bit to think of all the possible combinations of f-stops / shutter speeds etc. he cannot help but put more into the final product.

    I confess that I did a good bit of film shooting before going to digital. I became lazy and allowed myself satisfaction with poorer quality photos. I've now returned to film for any serious work but still keep the digital around for quickies.

    Nryant
     
  12. ajmall

    ajmall TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2004
    Messages:
    656
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Leicester, UK
    Photography in my mind will always be an art form and the advance of technology and tradition should be more embraced than feared and somewhat "slated". Digital photography has and will create incredible opportunities for the amateur and pro alike. I have met so many people who have said they will "never go digital" and months later they've got a DSLR never looked back.

    In terms of "excitement" of prints turning up, the same excitement i think exists when uploading a digital photo or printing it at home and being able to easily share it with the world on a critique or forum gallery.

    The essence of photography remains the same - it's just a matter of how much effort the photographer puts into it
     

Share This Page