monitor calibration eye one

Discussion in 'Digital Discussion & Q&A' started by pc2mac, May 29, 2008.

  1. pc2mac

    pc2mac TPF Noob!

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    Hi everyone,
    I just picked up a pantone eye one display 2 to calibrate my dell 2405fpw on my mac pro.
    I calibrated my monitors with the software and it went fine.
    Call me stupid, but I can't seem to see any actual difference when I look at the screen.
    I did print out a picture and it still isn't the same as what I see on screen. Maybe I'm doing something wrong.
    When I print using my hp b9180 I use the paper icc profile. i can preview the profile in aperture so I have a good idea on screen what it will look like.
    My results aren't much different from when I did the mac calibration in osx.

    I know calibration isn't 100%, but I'm wondering if I should keep it or return it.
     
  2. Jim H

    Jim H TPF Noob!

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    When you go to print, are you tuing off the printers color management settings so that Aperture is control of managing color?

    Here is a fairly quick and easy tutorial on how to set things up that may help.
     
  3. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The success of calibration depends entirely on how far out your screen was to begin with. The Dell 2405fpw is by no means a bad screen. When I calibrated my screen I went from a delta e (a measure of how far off the colours are) of 0.9 to 0.3. When I did my dad's screen it went from 3.2 to 1.1 and made a huge difference.

    I think the problem is most likely you are either calibrating to the wrong target or your printer is out.

    The 100% correct way of doing it is to have a neutral coloured box with even lighting to display you photo on, measure the incident light in that box, set you display target when calibrating to be exactly the same brightness and temperature as the lighting for the box, and then view the photos in the box next to the screen.

    Remember the photos depend on your room lights and the screen has a light of it's own, although one of the ideas of calibration is that the screen is calibrated to the same colour temperature as the room.

    For the record I'm using the same calibration unit as you.
     
  4. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I'm using a Spyder 2; the software in that has a feature whereby after the calibration you can load and unload the colour profile (basically flip between calibrated and non-calibrated) to see what the difference is. As far as seeing the difference in your printer, you should do a separate calibration for your printer to obtain best results.
     

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