Monitor help!!

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by BuZzZeRkEr, Feb 18, 2009.

  1. BuZzZeRkEr

    BuZzZeRkEr TPF Noob!

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    ok, whats the deal?

    I edit the pictures to look great on my monitor and settings, granted I have a pretty cheap monitor that relatively reflects the prints. I edit my pictures in SRGB, but today when I was presenting pictures to a client on their monitor they looked completely whacked!!! Everything was over saturated making people look like umpa lumpa's. Is there kind of a universal setting? Or particular monitor to be used? thanks for any help in advance.
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Do you calibrate your monitor?

    Anyone who is at least a little bit serious about digital photography/editing should calibrate their monitor...and that requires a hardware device like the Datacolor Spyder
     
  3. BuZzZeRkEr

    BuZzZeRkEr TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the info!

    I outsource my printing, and it seems some times it's dead on and sometimes it's way off....maybe it's time to find a better printer.
     
  4. frXnz kafka

    frXnz kafka TPF Noob!

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    It's possible that your client's monitor was way off. Or that yours a little off in one direction, and his a little off in the other direction, making for a big difference.

    Definitely calibrate your screen. You can't do anything about your clients' screens, but calibrating yours will level the playing field a little, and you should see more consistent results from your prints.
     

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