Monitors

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by Big Mike, Dec 2, 2005.

  1. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I bought a new desktop last month, we took the display model and the monitor was not new (refurbished). The body is not in great condition and the screen has a spec right in the middle. Anyway, they said we could trade it in when they got more in stock. (it's a 19" LCD b.t.w.)

    I'm going to trade it in on Monday...and today the guy said I might be able to upgrade the quality for a little extra scratch.

    So, what should I know about monitor quality? Resolution? Refresh rate? I'm not too up-to-speed on this topic. Can anyone enlighten me?
     
  2. woodsac

    woodsac TPF Noob!

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    Try and get something with a fast response time. The numbers are listed as **ms. Common seems to be around 16ms, but try and get something low like 8ms. Also try and get a higher contrast ratio, 500:1 or higher.

    I don't have the best monitor in the world, but it's still very good. Image quality is excellent and the view angle is decent too. Here are the specs:

    Brand HYUNDAI
    Model
    L90D+
    Cabinet Color Silver
    Display Panel A-Si TFT Active Matrix
    Screen Size
    19"
    Display Type
    SXGA
    Maximum Resolution
    1280x1024
    Recommended Resolution
    1280x1024
    Viewing Angle
    150°(H) / 135°(V)
    Pixel Pitch
    0.294mm
    Display Colours 16.7 Million
    Brightness
    300 cd/m2
    Contrast Ratio
    700:1
    Response Time
    8ms
    Horizontal Fresh Rate
    31kHz ~ 80 kHz
    Vertical Fresh Rate
    56 ~ 75 Hz
    Connectivity
    Input Video Compatibility R.G.B Analog, Digital Signal
    D-Sub
    1
    DVI
    1
    Power
    Power Supply 100 - 240 V AC
    Power Consumption 45W(Max)
    Convenience
    User Controls Analog: Brightness,Contrast, H/V-Position, Clock phase, Color Control, Language, Miscellaneous, Auto color Auto Adjustment, Audio
    Digital: Brightness,Contrast, Language, Miscellaneous, AUDIO, INPUT SELECT

    Regulatory Approvals cULus, TUV-GS, SEMKO, FCC Class B, CE,EN55022-B, VCCI
    Built in Speakers Built-in 2x 2w speakers
    Dimensions
    Dimensions (W×H×D) 16.3" x 17.1 x 7.9"
    Weight
    12.3 lbs
     
  3. Chase

    Chase I am now benign! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Response time (under 12ms...lower the better)
    Contrast Ration (higher the better)
    Brightness (brighter the better)

    Those three things are the best to look for....the better combination, the more you'll end up liking your monitor :)
     
  4. thebeginning

    thebeginning TPF Noob!

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    I've heard that CRTs have more accurate color rendition, actually. If you dont need it, those 19+ in LCDs sure make for a nice viewing screen.

    echo what chase said (duh :D). Try to find the best median.
     
  5. jstuedle

    jstuedle No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    That used to be true. In the last year or two LCD's have come a long way. The new higher contrast ratio and brighter LCD's are great! Color is very accurate, and they can be calibrated with the best CRT monitors. Add to that, their color is much more stable than CRT's, no warm-up time, and less heat output and lower power consumption. A lot easier on the eyes also.
     
  6. thebeginning

    thebeginning TPF Noob!

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    hmmm. maybe i should start using our 19in LCD more for my editing...i'll have to figure out it's specs first though
     
  7. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the tips.
     
  8. clarinetJWD

    clarinetJWD The Naked Spammer Staff Member

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    It'll have a resolution of 1280x1024, probably, so that's a non-factor. For photo editing, look for high brightness (260cd or brighter), low pixel-pitch (.27 or lower) and high contrast (500:1 minimum). For moving graphics, the draw time becomes important. My monitor has awesome contrast (1000:1) as well as decent other specs, but I do get some ghosting in games because the draw time is too slow. LCDs can be really good, or really, really bad, and if yours is no good, then it's definitely worth the money to upgrade.
    Personally, I like the Samsung ones, and the Dell Ultrasharp ones are great. (Normal Dell models are awful...)
     
  9. Polygon

    Polygon TPF Noob!

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    Be careful with "fast" TFTs. Most of them have a so-called TN-panel built in them. This results in a very instable image brightness along the vertical axis. I used such a monitor (Hyundai L90D+) for a few hours and when looking at it from the optimal position the upper parts were significantly brigther and the lower parts darker than they should be. For me it was a reason not to get that monitor as it was also disturbing when not "looking for it" (I may be very sensitive to that effect, I know some people who are happy with this monitor but none of them does graphics of photography). This effect is because of how TN-panels are built and will be equally strong at least in the same series of monitors. There might be improvements in that technology over time, though I've not seen them yet.
    Better choises might be TFTs with PVA or MVA panels. I currently have a Viewsonic VP191 and am very pleased with it (though it tends to render images too good so they look less colorful on other monitors and I'm not up to buy calibration equipment yet). But this field is all about a person's personal preferences and needs.
     

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