Mono

Discussion in 'Landscape & Cityscape' started by abraxas, Aug 5, 2007.

  1. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    10,417
    Likes Received:
    9
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    [​IMG]
     
  2. JYoung

    JYoung TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    South Africa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    What a beautiful, peaceful shot! I love this.
     
  3. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    10,417
    Likes Received:
    9
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Thanks!
     
  4. JYoung

    JYoung TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    South Africa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Is this part of Hoover Dam?
     
  5. tpe

    tpe TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    964
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Copenhagen Denmark
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thats wonderfull, the sky and its reflection complement each other soo well, and the way it fades to white really make it a sublime and dreamy picture, actually it has to be one of my favorites.

    tim
     
  6. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    10,417
    Likes Received:
    9
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    No, Mono Lake is located in east of the Sierra Nevada mountain range in California.

    I have a page on it >> Here <<

    The salt lake is the oldest lake in the United States, and too salty for fish. About the only thing that lives in the water are the brine shrimp and alkali flies along the edge, who's larvae is a big deal for several species of migrating birds, the eared grebe (pronounced greeb) in particular.

    The eared grebe, which looks like a combination of Clark's Grebe and my favorite, the pied-billed grebe, gathers in huge numbers to feast on the shrimp, and end up staying for a little vacation as they can double or triple their weight and can't fly until they lose it.

    There's an interesting story that goes with the larvae- at least to me; An American explorer, Joseph Reddeford Walker was looking for a trail across the desert from San Francisco to Salt Lake City in Utah. His men were starving when they happened upon an Indian village. The Indians had never seen white men and scattered on sight deserting the little camp. The men found a tasty meal plentiful throughout the camp. The food was high in protein and they ate their fill and loaded all they could find into their bags before they continued on their journey.

    The men of the Western Mono Paiute Indian tribe had been hunting when the band of white people raided the camp. The women and children who had ran away from the strange party informed the men of the theft of their winter food stores. The men of the tribe soon caught up with the expedition and asked if they could have their food back?

    Walker and the Indians negotiated as the food was more than enough for them to finish their trip. Walker asked, "By the way, what is it?" The Indians explained that it was the larvae of the flies along the lake, that every year the nomadic people came to the lake to gather the yellow-white goop and dry it on the flat rocks in the sun -- Walker and his men promptly returned the full measure of what they had stolen.

    If you are interested in seeing the location on a map of California, the easiest way to find it is to look about halfway up the state, find Yosemite National Park, and look east at the bottom of the Sierra Nevada mountain range.

    The Hoover Dam is located several hundred miles to the south along the Colorado River, which of course, is a whole other story.

    Sorry if some of the links aren't developed out all the way- I'm still plugging away at my lizards and snakes pages.

    The Great Outdoors is Great, because it's Outdoors :)
     
  7. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    10,417
    Likes Received:
    9
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit

    Thanks!!
     
  8. tpe

    tpe TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    964
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Copenhagen Denmark
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Cor blimy, where have you been hiding those pages, they are excelent. The lizard and snakes pages are most interesting for me, and a real treat. I am not sure about the red racer, but it turns out that racers may well be venomous, back fanged, but that their venom is very mild in humans and that they dont usually get the chance to chew it into their victim when biting people, if i find the article again i will send it your way.

    tim
     
  9. JYoung

    JYoung TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    South Africa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Walter, this is an amazing site and is going to take me ages to go through as I am interested in everything on it. Your pictures are stunning!!

    Tim, I would also be interested in the article on the red racer if you care to pass it on to me.
     
  10. tpe

    tpe TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    964
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Copenhagen Denmark
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I dont know about the red racer specifically but here is a reference to the first article on racer venom.

    Perry. G. Mild toxic effects resulting from the bites of Jan's desert racer, Coluber rhodorachis, and Moila's snake, Malpolon moilensis (Ophidia: Colubridae) Toxicon1988;26(6):523-4.

    I think that they say it is probably a common phenomenon but previously unnoticed because of its mild effect on humans

    All the articles as far as i can see are in toxicon, a journal i am sorry i dont have access to the full text any more without ordering it individually.


    But there are is probably some good reading in the abstracts of the related articles
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&DbFrom=pubmed&Cmd=Link&LinkName=pubmed_pubmed&LinkReadableName=Related%20Articles&IdsFromResult=3176046&ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus

    But possibly a little dry?!? :)

    tim

    I just had a look through google and it turned up more than the local science library, gulp!!!

    http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=00....0.CO;2-S&size=LARGE&origin=JSTOR-enlargePage

    This one is quite nice explaining why they may have venom glands to differing degrees...

    http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/msh091v1.pdf

    anyway sorry for digressing ...
     
  11. wolfepakt

    wolfepakt TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2003
    Messages:
    680
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    WY
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Beautiful pic, but I must admit my first thought was how did he get a picture of "kissing disease"?!
    But like I said, this is a great shot!
     
  12. JYoung

    JYoung TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    South Africa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Thanks for the info Tim. Between Walter's site and your links, I have a lot of reading to do which will keep me busy for a while.
     

Share This Page