Monopod Questions

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Dylan, Sep 1, 2006.

  1. Dylan

    Dylan TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    226
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Delaware
    I'm using an aluminum monopod (cheapie but very sturdy) for most of my shots and having trouble controlling camera shake. It's not a whole lot of shake but I did notice it when I was shooting yesterday. I don't have the prints yet so I'm not sure just how bad it is. What's the best way to hold one while shooting? I have a tripod however it doesn't extend high enough (I'm 6'1).

    Also, lens hoods, what is the difference between the cutout style (cut on the side and fully extended on top) and a standard hood that extends all the way around the lens? Is there any real advantage to either kind?
    Thanks

    Dylan
     
  2. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2006
    Messages:
    2,117
    Likes Received:
    37
    Location:
    Tottenville, Staten Island, NYC USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Lens hoods: The use of cut-outs is to avoid vignetting in the corners of the image when a wide angle lens is used, or when a wide angle - normal lens is used at the wide angle end of the range. Hoods used for standard lenses and telephotos do not need cut-outs due to the narrower viewing angle of the lens.
     
  3. Dylan

    Dylan TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    226
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Delaware
    Very interesting. I always wondered about that. Thanks for the info.
     
  4. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    14,491
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    Europe 67.51°N
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    ... also on some zoom lenses the foremost elemts might rotate, there you are in trouble with a cut out lens hood, as it might accidentally and unnoticed rotate from horizontal into vertical, giving a lot of vignetting. Here the round ones are safer.

    A cut out lens hood as used for wide angle is basically shaped as a projection of the rectangle of your film or sensor onto the cone or tube which the hood represents. If you look at it in a simplified way you could even imagine the outmost rays of light coming onto the lens (very simplified).

    As for the monopod, does your shake have a preferred orientation? Is it maybe just your motion when you press the shutter release?

    Of course a monopod will never give the stability of a tripod as it only removes motion in one coordinate (vertically), but not the other two.
    It certainly is a great help compared to free handed shooting though.

    How to hold it, depends on if you have a lightweight or heavy camera/lens combination and also is a thing of personal preference. supporting it by pressing it slightly onto one of your legs/knee might give further stabilisation.
    This of course only works if your legs do not shake when that Grizzly prepares for attack ;)
     
  5. castrol

    castrol TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2006
    Messages:
    421
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Spring, TX
    Also, when using your monopod... if you have a little bit of time to get the image,
    you can always set your self timer to a 2 second delay. This way you don't have
    the motion of your hand pressing the button to deal with. A MUST for tripod
    shots, but found it does seem to help with monopod shots as well. :)
     
  6. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2005
    Messages:
    6,217
    Likes Received:
    134
    Location:
    London
    There's two things I'd think to say about the monopod issue....

    Firstly, if you're too tall for it, then you're going to be at an awkward angle and this *will* make you shake.

    Secondly, if you're using a long lens, they often have a collar on them which is a better centre of gravity if you're not already using it.

    It should be noted that monopods are not as stable as perhaps a tripod, so it is worth looking at your exposure times. I reckon I can double the exposure length with one, so I can shoot a 400mm lens at 1/200th without too much of a problem.

    Hope this helps!

    Rob
     

Share This Page