moon glare? C&C please.

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by y0aimee, Dec 5, 2009.

  1. y0aimee

    y0aimee TPF Noob!

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    As I had a ciggy outside my house, I noticed a large, faint halo further away from the moon. It's probably due to the mist or marine layer in the sky? Either way, it was pretty interesting to see such a huge looking hole up there. haha.

    Anywhooz, can anyone provide helpful tips in regards to proper camera settings that can minimize the glare that's directly around the perimeter of the moon? I haven't had much practice with night shots so bear with me. Thanks =)

    My settings for this shot:
    manual
    ISO 200
    f 9
    shutter 30"
    18mm focal length

    (and yes, i see a glare right beneath the moon -_-)




    [​IMG]
     
  2. TJ K

    TJ K No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Fast shutter speed or you won't have detail in the moon. 1/250-1/500 should be good. To slow the moon gets blown out. GL
    tj
     
  3. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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  4. icassell

    icassell TPF Noob!

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    Shooting images of the moon is not like other night photography. The moon is a direct reflector of the sun's light, so the light for your exposure is actually quite bright -- requiring short shutter times/small aperture. It is tough to get a good exposure of stuff on the ground at the same time you get a good exposure of the moon for that reason.
     
  5. adwolfe12

    adwolfe12 TPF Noob!

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    When I was shooting the moon the other night I was using f/8, 1/125, and an iso of 100 or 200. I was also manual focusing.
    Alex
     
  6. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    Very true, the Moon is just reflecting Sunlight.

    The Moon is a poor reflector (Albedo). Overall the Moon only reflects about 11% of the Sunlight that hits it. With a full moon, and no clouds, that's bright enough that you'll cast a shadow.

    "I'm being followed by a Moon shadow, Moon shadow, Moon shadow." - Cat Stevens
     
  7. y0aimee

    y0aimee TPF Noob!

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    ahh icic... i always wondered how people got clear shots of the moon without glare, but now i know. thanks again!

    - use spot metering
    - faster shutter
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2009
  8. y0aimee

    y0aimee TPF Noob!

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  9. astrostu

    astrostu I shoot for the stars

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    I think everyone is missing the question of the original poster, or I'm completely misreading it -- the question I'm seeing is, "When photographing the halo, how do you get rid of the glare right around the moon?"

    The answer is you can't. The halo is caused by high, thin clouds refracting the light from the moon. It is much fainter than the moon and so requires a longer exposure. When you have a longer exposure, you're going to blow out the moon. But, because the very thing that you're photographing is caused by clouds, you're also going to pick up the glow the moon is causing the clouds to take on in its vicinity.
     
  10. altitude604

    altitude604 TPF Noob!

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    yeah, CirroStratus clouds... a very good indicator of and incoming warm front if there's a slowly descending layer of clouds approaching.
     
  11. taskoni

    taskoni TPF Noob!

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    I also noticed that I have way better results on a moon shots when away from town where the sky is much cleaner and the glare is somehow less, but not always :)
     

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