Multiple exposures

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by nealjpage, Jul 7, 2007.

  1. nealjpage

    nealjpage multi format master in a film geek package

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,479
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Oregon
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I've done a search here but didn't come up with much....so, ahem, sorry if this is a topic that has been discussed ad nauseum.

    I want to experiment with double exposed shots, but I have no idea where to even start. Is there a good rule of thumb for this that a guy with no training can look to? I use sunny 16 to my advantage most of the time, which seems to do me well.

    I plan on shooting Agfachrome 50 in either my ETRS or my Rolleicord, both of which is capable of multiple exposures. I also think I've figured out how to trick my K1000 into multiple frame mode, too. So, rather than ruining a perfectly good roll of film messing around, I figured I'd ask y'all first. Any tips would be greatly appreciated. :mrgreen:
     
  2. panocho

    panocho TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    425
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Compostela, GZ
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Just think that you're going to multi-expose and try to adapt metering readings according to that.

    Example: you shoot a person in a room multi-exposing so that she appears twice in the photo (let's say you want a funny effect, creating "twins" out of one person). So, if you want the person to appear correctly exposed, meter on him and just shoot -but then, keep in mind that the background (the room) will be shooted twice, that is, at that setting it will be far overexposed.
    Same situation, but you want the room to be properly exposed, and then when you meter divide the exposure in two (example: meter says f5.6, 1/30, then you shoot twice f.56, 1/60). In this case, keep in mind that both your "twins" will loke like ghosts, since the subject will be far underexposed.

    This might be more or less a typical situation to understand multi-exposure, I think. Try to work and figure out results from it.

    In case of subjects properly exposed without havind a overexposed background that fails to give a natural photo, try and work with backgrounds that won't tell either over or under exposing (black or white could be the easiest)

    Hope this helps as a first step. Other will contribute with more information
     
  3. nealjpage

    nealjpage multi format master in a film geek package

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,479
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Oregon
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Right now I'm going to try halving the film speed: shooting ASA 100 at 200, for example.
     
  4. panocho

    panocho TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    425
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Compostela, GZ
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    But remember that that way you'll have correctly exposed only what you shoot twice (f.ex. background). All that is shot only once will be underexposed. Keep that in mind.
     
  5. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2005
    Messages:
    5,454
    Likes Received:
    41
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Why bother changing the ISO? Just halve the shutter speed.
     
  6. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    16,728
    Likes Received:
    45
    Location:
    Where am I now?
    It doesn't matter whether you change the shutter speed, change the aperture or change the film speed just so long as you under-expose each of the two shots by one stop.
     

Share This Page