My first pictures

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by nazster14, Mar 1, 2010.

  1. nazster14

    nazster14 TPF Noob!

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    I would love some feeback from the pros..
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  2. lexdiamond20

    lexdiamond20 TPF Noob!

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    Nice room but looks like a snapshot as they would call it.
    Increase the shutter speed on the mirror shot to eliminate the cam shake.
    Not really feeling the toy shot but Buddah is the best.
    Love the bokeh and the fact that you didn't center it allowing some of the background, though blurred, into the shot.
     
  3. reznap

    reznap No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I really like #4 as well. Are those packing peanuts?

    Your self portrait would be better if it were less blurry. Try shooting it in a continuous burst, you'll get lucky with one of them. 1/4 second is tough for handheld stuff. Also, do most people close their non-viewfinder eye for these or not? I think lex has his eye open in his avatar.
     
  4. myvinyl333

    myvinyl333 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I am partial to Buddha, although your self portrait is interesting with the curves in the mirror. :thumbup:
     
  5. Bitter Jeweler

    Bitter Jeweler Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Buddha has a major flaw.
    He is facing out of the frame to the left, rendering the entire right side, useless.
     
  6. nazster14

    nazster14 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks guys,

    I don't know if its called peanuts but it does look like one and its used for packaging so I am guessing its called packaging peanuts.

    I will give it a shot at self portrait again.

    Ya about the buddha, I thought about it too, that its looking at the different angle. But, it was the blur that I was trying to get it and was not able to do so before and this one came out quite good.
     
  7. bazooka

    bazooka No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I hope I don't get detention from Bitter, but I might disagree with the idea that the subject looking out of the nearby frame makes the area behind it useless. Generally, it's best to have the subject looking across the frame, yes, but in some cases, having them look away from the frame causes me to a.) Wonder what the heck that they're looking at (because there must be something really interesting OOFrame, right? and b.) I wonder if something's going to move into the frame behind them (often used in horror flicks). These feelings could be useful in certain situations, in my humble opinion.

    In this specific case, I'm not sure either of these apply... maybe the first. But although your composition does create some tension, it's still nice for my eyes to rest on the peanuts occasionally. To me, it's a bit more interesting the way you have it... less typical... refreshing perhaps?

    Yeah, I dunno what I'm talking about. Please don't beat me. :hug::
     
  8. LearnMyShot

    LearnMyShot TPF Noob!

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    Not bad! The room shot could be better by clearing the clutter and just shooting that rug and table in an empty space with the window in the background...in would create an interesting mood...just my thoughts
     
  9. Bitter Jeweler

    Bitter Jeweler Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I like discussion. :D

    Is this one of those situations?



    To me, neither apply here.

    I don't believe eyes like to rest on blurry parts.


    Less typical doesn't equal effective. If you follow that logic, beginner shots are very often "less typical" of good composition. This image would be more effective, if the Buddha were facing the camera.
    But in the end we have a typical "RoT" single subject, empty background shot.

    No beating. This time. :p Just take what I have said, think about it, and then discard it if you find it to be hogwash. Debate is healthy though...
     
  10. Bitter Jeweler

    Bitter Jeweler Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I looked for examples of when looking out of the same side of the frame works.

    Here, his body faces into the frame, and like you mentioned, he looks like something has grabbed his attention frame left. His expression, and body position helps this. Where as the Buddha lacks expression, and the idea that it is distracted. Going back to your "horror flick" example, that would work if there was something that suggests to the viewer of the image, that something is back there, and that the subject is in danger, such as a hand coming up out of the peanuts, in the upper right of the frame. The viewer doesn't tend to "fill in" information that just isn't there.
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    I think this is another example.
    Now his body is on the right side and facing out of the frame. His head turned into the frame gives the viewer the idea that something is making him look that way, and makes the viewer look for it too. While in the image, there is more to look at on the left, it still leaves the viewer wondering.

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