My first Wedding

Discussion in 'General Shop Talk' started by Lindam, Mar 30, 2007.

  1. Lindam

    Lindam TPF Noob!

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    Hi,

    Im shooting my first wedding in a couple of weeks time for a friend. I just have a few questions, How long should i spend on the formal shots at the reception, I know im going to be nervous so i hope i wont mess up on my pose or make mistakes, any tips? and lastly its sounds so cheessy to day 123 smile, does anyone use any other propmt, ive a feeling im going to be so nervous that i wont be much good at small talk ,any advice greatly apreciated?
     
  2. RVsForFun

    RVsForFun TPF Noob!

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    Take a list of shots (formals) you want to do so you don't forget. I do say "smile", by the way, when shooting groups.

    How are you going to light the group shots?
     
  3. dbyrd

    dbyrd TPF Noob!

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    I usually did all my formal shots at the Church and not the reception. I would not accept a Wedding assignment if the Bride did not have a co-ordinator( pro or family). The co-ordinator would be responsible for rounding up the wedding party and family after the ceremony. Have a plan in place on your sequence of shots. I always started with the full wedding party and then start letting them go(so they could get to the reception), until just the Bride and Groom and family are left, do the same thing until just the Bride and Groom are left. Do their shots(have some fun with them).
    I would spend an hour doing the formal shots(with a co-ordinator). I generally spent a little more time after a Baptist ceremony just because of the shortness of it. Catholic ceremonies take a bit of time.
    Take a list of shots that the bride wants. Take two of everything(equipment).
    Receptions are a waste of time, everyone has a camera!
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    Where I live, it's typical to do the 'formal' shots after the ceremony but before they go to the reception. Usually they pick a location that is different from the reception and often different from the ceremony. The means that travel time has to be figured in but it's also good because you get to leave most of the guests behind.

    It's usually not a matter of how much time should you spend...it's how much can you get done in the time that you have. Weddings are often very hectic days and time is a precious commodity. You may tell them that you need an hour and then end up with 20 minutes. I think it's important to try to book as much time as possible because who know what may come up.

    If you are shooting at the reception, expect a lot of guest to be around...all of them with their digi-cams. Controlling them may be just as important as controlling the bridal party and family. I agree with dbyrd, having a coordinator will be a huge help.
     
  5. EOS_JD

    EOS_JD TPF Noob!

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    Good advice from dbyrd.

    Weddings are tough and posing believe it or not is one of the hardest things to do. You hear stories about "how bad an attitude the wedding photographer had"..... well now I know why!

    It's so difficult to get the right people at the right time and to stand the way you want them to. You place the dress, you sort people's feet and hands you turn around to take the shot and they've all moved!!! 1 hour should get them done though. As dbyrd states start with the largest group and let people leave as you whittle the numbers down until you have only the B&G left.

    If you can do the formals at the church all the better. If not make sure you get a nice location or the B&G sort out a location for you.

    Taking 2 of everything (equipment) is advised. 2 cameras, 2 flashes, lots of memory (shoot RAW), fast lenses help if the church is dark, fast prime for low light reception (if you are staying for that).

    Use the flash as fill for the formals particularly if shooting in the mid day sun. It will lighten your shadows. Set the flash to FP mode (if you have that).

    Don't panic..... and good luck :)
     
  6. dbyrd

    dbyrd TPF Noob!

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    One more thing. If you want to make alot of extra cash on the side: Take an assistant(other photographer), set up a mini studio at the reception with a nice background and lights. You can then do "Formal" portraits for the guests and out of town family. They are all dressed up anyway and will relish the opportunity for portraits. I often made as much money doing this as I did off of the wedding. Be sure to ask the bride about it prior to signing contracts, they are usually thrilled with the idea.
    BTW, I would never shoot a wedding for a friend!
     
  7. Jim Gratiot

    Jim Gratiot TPF Noob!

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    Excellent idea!
     

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