ND filter question

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by burstintoflame81, Sep 2, 2009.

  1. burstintoflame81

    burstintoflame81 TPF Noob!

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    How do I know what level of filter ( or degree or whatever you would call it) I should use? I am looking for something to use during the day due to it being very bright midday. I also would like something to use when doing long exposures of water, or waterfalls at the beach during the day. Thanks guys.
     
  2. kundalini

    kundalini Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I like to shoot waterfalls. So I went with a Hoya Pro1 ND x8 (3-stop) filter.

    Probably a good idea to have a CPL filter in your bag as well.
     
  3. burstintoflame81

    burstintoflame81 TPF Noob!

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    Well I have circular polarized filters and UV filters for all my lenses already. Sunpak brand so eventually I would like to get some higher end ones. I will start with the ND filter your suggested. Maybe grab one just one lower than that as well. ( would it be x6? )
     
  4. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Neutral Density Filter Information

    This information ought to get you started. Keep in mind that a circular polarizing filter can eliminate reflections on the surface of water which can either make, or break, many water and riverine scenes. Oftentimes people will resort to a CPL when trying to get a little bit more light eliminated with a moderate to weak ND filter.

    Of course, keeping your ISO level low will help maximize the slow shutter speeds, but with today's good sensors, it's not absolutely necessary to shoot at the absolute lowest ISO settings, and in fact, bracketng your shots using ISO as the exposure variable is an excellent strategy when using ND, or doing other types of slow-speed exposures.

    Eliminating the reflections on top of slow-moving rivers or creeks can sometimes eliminate the majority of the subtle depth clues, often leading to the impression of looking not at a river or creek, but of a bunch of wet rocks, so do be careful with how you employ a polarizer if you use on in conjunction with an ND filter.
     
  5. kundalini

    kundalini Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Your call dude.

    Taken with the x8 ND.

    [​IMG]


    Cropped
    [​IMG]


    Probably not the best example, but it was taken in the 12:00 to 3:00 time slot, if memory serves me well.​
     
  6. pmcbrier

    pmcbrier TPF Noob!

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    Does anyone have a photo w/o the ND filter, and one with? Thanks.
     
  7. burstintoflame81

    burstintoflame81 TPF Noob!

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    Those look pretty good. I wasn't saying that I wasn't going to go with your advice, I just figured I might as well have one step a little lower , so I was flexible and not stuck with either x8 or no ND filter at all.
     

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