ND Filters

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by uplander, Feb 19, 2009.

  1. uplander

    uplander TPF Noob!

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    I want to get a few ND's but could use some input from those who use them.
    First mainly how much of an advantage are multi coated filters over non coated ? I will primarily be using Canon L lenses.

    What about wide filters for wide angle lenses and vignetting problems?

    Any other tips or thoughts on ND's also.
     
  2. Soda Ant

    Soda Ant TPF Noob!

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    Get quality multicoated filters (e.g. B+W or Heliopan), especially if you've shelled out the bucks for L lenses.

    You wouldn't put cheap gas in a Ferrari, would you?
     
  3. Phranquey

    Phranquey TPF Noob!

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    If you are going to use a filter, buy coated, period.

    Most vignetting problems come from lens / camera issues. Again, quality filters will help avoid the potential.

    Thoughts and tips....I use them. If you have a polarizer, you already have nearly the equivalent of an ND2. I use an ND8 all the time when daytime storm chasing. It gives me the capability of an extra 3 stops of open shutter time for that additional possibility of catching lightning. They're also good when you have a bright scene with moving water, and you want to be able to hold the shutter open longer to soften the water movement.....
     
  4. dcclark

    dcclark TPF Noob!

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    How do you plan to use your NDs? That can affect what exactly you want. For example, I enjoy photographing waterfalls, so a 3 stop ND filter is a pretty good amount to help smooth out the water in my experience (Called ND3, ND 8x, or ND 0.9 depending on who you talk to). On the other hand, polarizers are very useful on their own and are roughly equivalent to a 2-stop ND -- with other benefits!

    Finally, if you're looking at landscape photography, you might consider a graduated ND filter. That can help to balance out the sky with the ground. For some reason, it's harder to find strong filters of this type, but there are many more interesting colors. Good luck!
     
  5. Phranquey

    Phranquey TPF Noob!

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    Different manufacturers have different annotations. You will see ND2, ND4, ND8....ND3, ND6, ND9....ND0.3, ND0.6, ND0.9...etc. Each of these steps is in stops of light, with the higher number allowing half the light of the previous number.

    And what polarizer do you have that blocks 2 full stops of light????? Mine is slightly less than 1-stop (hence, an ND2).
     
  6. dcclark

    dcclark TPF Noob!

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    My mistake -- I got the powers of 2 (ND2, 4, 8) and the stop counts backwards. I sure wish the terminology were more consistent. :) Yes, 1 stop is about right.
     
  7. Phranquey

    Phranquey TPF Noob!

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    I wish it were, too.

    If you actually had a 2-stop polarizer, I'd want to know where to get one....
     
  8. uplander

    uplander TPF Noob!

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    Well i was thinking of getting a ND 0.6 or 0.9 for such thingd as moving water and lightening.

    A GND for landscape and when I have daylight to shadow problems.

    I thought of a polarizer also but not sure how much of a benifit it will add.


    There is a wide variation out there in in what is available from just a single manufacturer line let alone the number of different Co. (B&W, Tiffen, Heliopan, ect.)

    There is are coated , multicoated, hard grads, soft grads, Glass, coated polymers ect.
    Filters designated for HD, Digital, High transmission,ect.

    I just wanted some input.
    All my lenses are 77mm theaded
    prices vary from $30.00 to close to $500.00

    I like to buy the best but hate spending more for a next to unnoticeable gain in performance.
     
  9. 250Gimp

    250Gimp TPF Noob!

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    Just out of curiousity....can you stack a CPL on an ND filter?
     
  10. Phranquey

    Phranquey TPF Noob!

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    You can stack whatever you like.....

    Just remember that every filter you stack is placing an additional layer of glass in front of your sensor, so image degradation is more likely. And, even with coated filters, two layers of flat glass that close together is more likely to cause flares.
     

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