Need advice on camera selection

Discussion in 'Digital Discussion & Q&A' started by sealcorp, Sep 27, 2007.

  1. sealcorp

    sealcorp TPF Noob!

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    I have a particular need, and I am hoping the experts here can help! I have a semi-old Scanning Electron Microscope, and was looking to upgrade the photographic capabilities by adding a digital camera. What I need is a USB camera (to be able to do captures of the various specimens on a PC), that can focus at a short distance (from about 8 inches down to about 4 inches), and that is capable of producing a high-resolution picture.

    Also, because of the size and shape of the opening, a cylindrical camera body would be preferable, but is not mandatory. And we really need it more for captures than for motion video.

    Am I asking too much? I have looked around, and determined that I just don't know what I am looking for! What type(s) of camera would you recommend.

    Thanks in advance for any information.
     
  2. wildmaven

    wildmaven TPF Noob!

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    What is the size of the eyepiece?
     
  3. sealcorp

    sealcorp TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the quick reply!

    The opening is approximately 3" in diameter. The setup is a small CRT mounted inside a small enclosure with the 3" hole as the only opening. Originally there was a polaroid camera connected to the hole with a fixture. When you had a specimen exactly the way you wanted, you switched the video to this CRT, and "snapped" the photo. I have tested this with a smaller, low-resolution digital camera, and it took an excellent photo (given its limited resources), I just need it to be a higher-resolution photo, and better focus at close range.
     

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