Need advice on shooting interiors (arch work)

Discussion in 'Commercial/Product photography' started by dpolston, Feb 20, 2008.

  1. dpolston

    dpolston TPF Noob!

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    I have been asked by an interior decorator and a high end cabinet builder (two totally different contacts - just a weird coincidence) and they each want before, during and after shots of their work. I have little experience in this specific style of shots but I have taken interiors before, just not the magazine quality they're looking for.

    I think I have a problem off the bat because the largest app lens I have is an 18mm. I have a Sigma 24-70 2.8 being shipped out this week (bought it last night) and I do have a 3 strobe kit and reflectors I use all the time for portraits. I know that lighting is the key but what are the little nuances that I'm not thinking about?

    I have a 10-20mm lens on a wish list and hadn't planned to order it yet but if I need it I will get it.

    Please give me some advice on this and I don't mean any disrespect at all but I am looking for people that have shot this on a professional level more or less. Where are the pro's that can help me? I know you're out there.

    Thanks!

    David
     
  2. dpolston

    dpolston TPF Noob!

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    I thought I'd add... If there are video tutorials out there, link me! I went to a bookstore today looking but I only found one book on interiors and it wasn't all that good. It talked more on natural light, finding the right location and decorating than it did on practical light setups.
     
  3. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Is the 18mm a Nikkor? I can't imagine anything wider than that would be necessary, or useful for that matter.

    I think lighting is key. As a portrait photographer, you know there's more to lighting than merely getting proper exposure.

    How I proceed would depend on the size of the rooms to be photographed. If you're talking residential, I think I'd try to create my own lighting. If I'm shooting large, commercial buildings, it's gonna be much harder to create light, especially with strobes. I would shoot at the smallest aperture possible... f22 usually.

    The cabinets will have additional concerns is they have a gloss finish.

    It might be simpler to discuss this on the phone. Call me if you like, and I'd be happy to tell you what I do.

    -Pete

    And, oh.... here's a link to some of my work.
     
  4. dpolston

    dpolston TPF Noob!

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    Yup... phone call will do it! pm me the number please
     
  5. dpolston

    dpolston TPF Noob!

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    pete... here's the lighting
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 11, 2014
  6. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    Take your time with this one. You guys are going to produce some amazing work. The 24-70 should be fine. Going wide should only be a last resort or used creatively. Meaning both clients are going to want as little distortion as possible. The way you approach the lighting should be a team effort with the designer. Generally speaking I take into consideration the mood of the room and then accentuate. As opposed to blasting it with light. Lighting for the cabinetmaker will be a lot harder. The finish can be a problem in that it may reflect. Consider tons of foamcore to bounce off of. Or very carefully place your highlights. Colour will be very, very important.

    The setup for this kind of work can be pretty time consuming. I always make sure the client is fully happy with each shot before I leave.

    They will expect the finest quality. Make sure the final shots do not need a whole lot of cropping or toning.

    Love & Bass
     
  7. skieur

    skieur TPF Noob!

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    To add something new, HDR is an approach to solving the light problem associated with windows in the shot, particularly if it is a very bright day outside.

    skieur
     
  8. dpolston

    dpolston TPF Noob!

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    This decorator is very traditional, VERY traditional so I am going for a pure image. Although I am not discounting the idea of it.

    Pete... I took some very random test shots today (of a house I am bidding to paint) and I think I might need that 10-20. I shot it with my new 24-70 and I'm not sure I can capture the entire room. This large room was about 13'x18' and I couldn't get the entire room. I might be rethinking the 10-20 distortion issue.

    If you have a wide lens in that range... could you (or anybody really) pop a shot or 2 to see how much distortion it has please (I don't have that wide of a lens).
     
  9. clawery

    clawery TPF Noob!

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    Two things that I could suggest. 1. Use any available light to your advantage and supplement it with strobe or hot lights. 2. Try to scout the location to see when and where the light will be best.

    Chris Lawery
    Capture Integration
    www.captureintegration.com
    chris@captureintegration.com
    (404)234-5195 cell
    (404)522-7662 office
     

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