need camera help????

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by amarlls, Oct 7, 2006.

  1. amarlls

    amarlls TPF Noob!

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    HELLO I AM A FORMER PHOTOGRAPHER THAT IS LOOKING TO GET BACK INTO IT. I LIKE TO TAKE A LOT OF LANDSCAPE AND NATURE PHOTOS SO ID LIKE TO HAVE SOMETHING WITH A LOT OF ZOOM AND CLARITY. IVE BEEN OUT FOR A WHILE AND PHOTOGRAPHYS ADVANCED IN MANY WAYS SINCE IVE DONE IT. WHICH IS THE BETTER WAY TO GO DIGITAL OR FILM CAMERAS FOR WHAT IM LOOKING FOR?? ALSO WHAT BRAND AND MODEL CAMERA IS THE BEST ONE OUT THERE. ID LIKE TO BUY SOMETHING REALLY NICE THAT I CAN USE FOR REGULAR PHOTOS AND ALSO PORTFOLIO QUALITY PHOTOS. I WANT TO BE ABLE TO PT ON MY COMPUTER AS I AM IN GRAPHIC DESIGN ALSO?? PLEASE LET ME KNOW ANY INFO YOU MAY HAVE AND SUGGESTIONS????
     
  2. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    Honestly couldn't say. 35mm or medium format, possibly even large format if you're serious enough about landscapes... negative or transparency film... digital SLR or digital medium format... it all depends on how you like to work and whether you prefer the actual process as well as the results from either digital or film. It also depends on how much money you are willing to spend. Really, there is no simple answer to this.

    Again, there is no real answer to this question. For example if you went for digital SLR, the 'best' in terms of actual features, resolution etc might be a Canon 5D, 1Ds Mk2 or Nikon D2X; for film SLRs the most advanced and toughest may be one of the Nikon F-series or a Canon EOS 1 model. Maybe SLRs simply don't offer enough resolution, maybe you need a Hasselblad or Mamiya. But in addition to being hugely expensive, these could be completely the wrong camera for your purposes. 'Best' is subjective; it would help if you let us know exactly what you want - i.e. what size enlargements are you likely to make, do you prefer colour or black & white, do you want something you can carry around and use quickly or are you happy carrying heavy gear and spending quite a lot of time setting it up?


    If the majority of your work will be edited or printed digitally then I think digital is clearly the way to go; if on the other hand only part of it will be processed digitally then you may be ok using film and scanning it.

    Just one more... the Caps Lock key is to the left of the A key. Try it. :biggrin:
     

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