Need help finding a camera

Discussion in 'Digital Discussion & Q&A' started by Squeeky, Jul 31, 2008.

  1. Squeeky

    Squeeky TPF Noob!

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    I want to get a dslr but am not sure on which one, theres so many out there & I have little knowledge of what's important in a camera. I did narrow it down a little I think. I'm on a limited budget (asuming I get the nerve to buy it) and figured 1k isn't bad of a price for a dslr. For the lens I want a zoom thats like 50mm-300mm & the resolution about 8.

    Two cameras I have found that sound good are the Olympus EVOLT E-510 & the canon 40d. The canon sounds better to me but also cost more. I'm not sure if it'd be worth the exspence if the evolt is just as good

    I'm still not sure of what I'd take photos of but I'm thinking macro & landscapes for the most part. I don't really stick with one type, but take photos of what catches my interest at the time. I'd love one that can last a long time, so that I don't end up getting better then the camera & end up needing a new one quick. I'm not really sure what I need in a camera, not even the exstreme basics like you'd need no matter what you shoot.
    Thanks for all the help to those have answered & to anyone who might help me now.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2008
  2. iflynething

    iflynething TPF Noob!

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    Lets make it general with all of these.

    Image Stabilization: Most have this from the lens. Canon is IS, Nikon VR. Not sure about the others
    Aperture/Shutter Priority: All DSLR's will have this (that I'm aware of(
    White Balance: Most have this. Auto, Incandescent, etc and Preset
    Digital Zoom: If it had digital zoom, it's not a DSLR. They are all optical and you get the zoom directly through moving the lens. Most starting cameras come with a zoom that is about a 3x equivalent.
    Frames Per Second (FPS): Vary from camera to camera. I believe the Olympus is 3.5 and the Canon is 6.5.
    ISO: Most cameras go up pretty high but usually stop at 3200 or so. There is such a thing as Ho.1 and Ho. 2 which would be equivalent to 6400, less and more. I wouldn't shoot above 800 ISO on any DSLR (maybe the D3 or D300 from Nikon)
    Live View: Some people like it, some people don't. Personally, I DO NOT. It sucks up your batters and most camera out there dont' autofocus. Pretty sure the 40D will not focus. There is nothing more that pains me more than seeing someone holding a SLR our in front of them. Leave that to a point and shoot to use live view.
    Hot Shoe/Red Eye: It's all in the flash for the red eye and most starter camera will have a hot shoe for an external flash. The 5D from Canon does not have this.
    Proprietary Batteries: ? Huh. Most will have a rechargable battery. About 500 shots for each.
    Water and Shock Proof: Ain't happenin with a DSLR.
    Dust Reduction: Some starter cameras will offer the sensor cleaning which will help reduce the amount of dust on the sensor. I know the Nikon D60 offers this.



    To pretty much sum it up, I dont' think you're going to get away with under $1,000 for a 40D. Might need to stick with the Nikon D series (40, 60) or like the Canon XTI and XSi, Sony Alpha 350 (which has an INCREDIBLE live view. If that's really what you want).

    Hope this helps. As you can see, I'm pretty bored. I normally wouldn't draw out my answer like that.

    ~Michael~
     
  3. Squeeky

    Squeeky TPF Noob!

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    It does help. I've posted this on another site and they sugested the rebels and nikion 40d too. Sounds like I should get one of them types. Thanks so much for exsplaining what the things do, as I am really new to this stuff and my only knowlege is either from a year ago or from somewhere on the internet where the companys can help push me towards a more exspensive camera.
     
  4. iflynething

    iflynething TPF Noob!

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    Well with $1,000, you're not limiting, but you won't get all of what you're looking for, for that price. I do shoot Nikon but I'm not biased towards it.

    ~Michael~
     
  5. peterbj7

    peterbj7 TPF Noob!

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    Look at http://www.jdpower.com/electronics/ratings/digital-camera-ratings/dslr. Nikon and Canon seem to leapfrog each other at the top, with all other manufacturers some way below.

    Remember that you have to make two decisions that will affect your choices later on. The make you go for will clearly determine the lenses you buy. But the sensor size will also greatly affect your lens choices. Most DSLRs have sensors smaller than a 35mm film frame, often by a factor of 1.3, 1.5 or 1.6 (depends on manufacturer). With one of these "cropped" sensors you can use smaller lenses than for a full frame sensor, which makes the whole package smaller and lighter. But the ultimate image quality is inherently less with a cropped sensor, and many users of these cameras have subsequently switched to a camera with a FF sensor. Not only the old body has to be changed, but any lenses that were designed specifically for a cropped sensor won't work with a FF camera and also need to be changed.

    That said, many people are happy with the results they get from cropped sensor cameras. Two cameras that I would look at quite seriously are the Canon 40D and the Nikon D40. Both are good, both have enthusiastic devotees. But before you choose, decide what sort of photography you want to do and what lenses from each manufacturer might suit. Different manufacturer's ranges do vary very considerably.

    If you have an experienced photographer friend who's prepared to help, I'd seriously consider buying used. Values of photographic gear drop rapidly, so why not take advantage of that?
     
  6. Squeeky

    Squeeky TPF Noob!

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    I only want what I need and I'm hopeing the camera I get has some bonuses anyway for the fun of it.
     
  7. peterbj7

    peterbj7 TPF Noob!

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    But what is that?
     
  8. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

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    "Image Stabilization: Most have this from the lens. Canon is IS, Nikon VR. Not sure about the others"

    Actually most have in camera solutions and ONLY Canon and Nikon are so lame as to leave it in the lens - increasing lens costs and making the effectiveness of the system implementation critical. One lens's VR or IS may suck while another's will be great.

    I think they did it on purpose in order to maximize profits myself. They get to sell upgraders not only a new body but if you want anti-shake of some kind it's all new lenses too. :(

    For this reason, regardless the advertisements everybody seems to parrot and/or perhaps believe, I think Nikon and Canon are maybe the 2 worst considerations for a 1st dSLR.

    Olympus, Pentax, Sony, Fuji, Panasonic, Samsung, all make good cameras with more features, more intelligent features, sometimes with better build quality, and often at a lower price point than either Nikon or Canon for entry, mid level, and even occasionally at the professional level.

    It's weird tho. It's like a brandname craze or something. As long as it says Jordash it doesn't seem to matter that the jeans will fall apart after the third washing, it says Jordash on the label so people will pay $200 for a pair. :confused:

    OK, that's kind of a rant but it's pretty true. Don't limit yourself to Nikon and Canon when Olympus, Pentax, Sony, Fuji, Panasonic, or Samsung may have better smarter machines.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2008
  9. reg

    reg TPF Noob!

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    [​IMG]

    I hope you're enjoying that crack you just smoked.
     
  10. peterbj7

    peterbj7 TPF Noob!

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    They do indeed do it on purpose, as only with the focussing motor and image stabilisation in the lens does it work fast and accurately. Image stabilisation in the camera body is ineffectual. Given that almost all professional photographers choose Nikon or Canon, isn't it rather strange that they're all being so seriously conned by these devious manufacturers?
     
  11. peterbj7

    peterbj7 TPF Noob!

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    Frames Per Second (FPS): Vary from camera to camera. I believe the Olympus is 3.5 and the Canon is 6.5.
    which Canon? they vary enormously
    ISO: Most cameras go up pretty high but usually stop at 3200 or so. There is such a thing as Ho.1 and Ho. 2 which would be equivalent to 6400, less and more. I wouldn't shoot above 800 ISO on any DSLR (maybe the D3 or D300 from Nikon)
    many DSLRs will shoot very well above ISO 800. I routinely use my Canon 5D to 1600 and sometimes to 3200
    Hot Shoe/Red Eye: It's all in the flash for the red eye and most starter camera will have a hot shoe for an external flash. The 5D from Canon does not have this
    total nonsense, as someone else has already pointed out. The 5D, like other high-end cameras from several manufacturers, doesn't have an internal flash
     
  12. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

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    "only with the focussing motor and image stabilisation in the lens does it work fast and accurately"

    Bzzzzt. not true. In-lens systems are usually slower and less capable.

    My $200 camera has better IS than a $2000 lens. I've tested this. Actually. I hear people say: "I get this new VR lens and I took this shot at 1/20th" and seem impressed with that. I just giggle to myself and take the same shot at less than 1/4.

    No, in camera systems or at least the one developed by minolta is quantitatively superior. Sony who recently purchased Minolta's camera works, has taken this a step further and is claiming to have a system that will stabilize several more stops than any other system on the market. Including their own previous system - which I use and is AWESOME.

    I'm not talking about the digital systems in the Point&Shoot cams you know. I'm talking about the ones that actually move the sensor around. Minolta, Pentax, Olympus, Sony, etc.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2008

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