Need help with sutdio lighting setup

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by zapman29, Aug 3, 2008.

  1. zapman29

    zapman29 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 21, 2008
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Okinawa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Sorry may have been asked before but I am very new to studio lighting. I just bought a basic studio set.. Right now I am using a strobe light it has a 100 watt modeling lamp with a 150watt flash bulb, with an umbrella. with our with out the umbrealla, every shot I take is nothing but white flash over my subject. Its is drowned in it.. I have turned down my flash all the way and moved it further away fromt he subject, still the same...

    Now I am thinking i must need to set the camera up but really dont know how.. Any help or links would be great thanks in advance...
     
  2. K_Pugh

    K_Pugh No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    1,344
    Likes Received:
    75
    Location:
    Scotland
    did you try increasing the F-stop? I have no experience with studio lighting at all so i don't know about the light settings etc.. but using a smaller aperture should work (greater in number)
     
  3. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2005
    Messages:
    5,454
    Likes Received:
    41
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    If you have a flash meter, use it. Otherwise, stop down.
     
  4. K_Pugh

    K_Pugh No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    1,344
    Likes Received:
    75
    Location:
    Scotland
    "stop down" was what i was trying to say.. jargon busting.
     
  5. Jedo_03

    Jedo_03 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2008
    Messages:
    328
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    150ws isn't all that powerful for studio lighting... and if you have a 100w modelling light and a 150ws strobe - then the strobe is only 50% brighter than the modelling light... So it must be your camera settings...
    Post your camera settings (aperture, shutter speed, iso) and we can make an informed comment
    Jedo
     
  6. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2008
    Messages:
    7,274
    Likes Received:
    406
    Location:
    Shepherdsturd, WV / Almost, MD
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Shoot at about ISO 100, shutter speed 200, and the adjust the aperture to control the exposure on your subject.

    Oh....and post examples, good or bad.
     
  7. zapman29

    zapman29 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 21, 2008
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Okinawa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    thanks for the comments I will do what I can and try to post pics.. thanks

    Z
     
  8. zapman29

    zapman29 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 21, 2008
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Okinawa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    this is my setup and the next one is my shot.. see how its all whited out, I did the iso and shutter with the same results
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Patrice

    Patrice No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2006
    Messages:
    2,392
    Likes Received:
    381
    Location:
    Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada
    One or two suggestions:

    Move your background way back - create some separation between your subject and background.

    Dial down your camera right light a bit and soften it a bit.

    low iso - larger aperture - faster shutter speed if you can.

    If still too bright move your lights back.
     
  10. frXnz kafka

    frXnz kafka TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2007
    Messages:
    517
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maine
    Shutter speed doesn't matter with flash. You need to stop down your aperture. Smaller aperture (larger f-number).

    Also, what is your shutter speed? Are you metering the ambient? The TTL meter in your camera isn't going to do you much good here. Just shoot at your sync speed (probably 1/250, judging by the box in the first image ;)), and adjust your aperture until you get the proper exposure.
     
  11. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    3,312
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Japan
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    frXnz is right. Given all other exposure critical settings are the same, shutter speed (ranging from slightly above correct at room light to your max sync speed) will not affect the brightness of the exposure. If it's at or below "correct for room light" it will though.
     
  12. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2006
    Messages:
    11,441
    Likes Received:
    2,100
    Location:
    Wichita, Kansas, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    By chance do you have a softbox, brolly box or another umbrella? Your are shooting undiffused bare light at a reflective surface. I would first diffuse the right hand strobe. That will help to reduce the glare.

    Do you have a flash meter by chance? If so, you need to take a reading of the right hand strobe. It is overpowering your subject with light causing blowout as well. To get a proper exposure you will need to average the readings from your two lights to get the proper exposure setting.

    If you don't have a flash meter you are just going to have to chimp your way down until you get the look you want by lowering ISO, upping aperture and moving the light source back. Preferably the right hand source first. Once you get that light in the range you want then you can work the left hand light.

    As an alternative if you don't have another diffuser you might consider using the umbrella on your main light and using a reflector as you fill from the other side. You get you the settings you want for your main light then add the reflector to the other side and move it around until you get the fill look you want.

    As suggested, get your subject away from you background. I try to keep at least 6 feet when ever possible. That will also allow you to get your background light behind you subject instead of at the side. Also once you get your exposure the way you want it play with your background light. Lower to the ground maybe, at an angle etc, depending on the look you are going for.

    If you are interested in doing studio photography I would strongly suggest looking into a flash meter. There are several good ones out there. I personally like the Sekonic 358. Not too expensive, accurate and good studio functionality such as calculating ratios etc. If you are planning on making a living out of it there are better meters available, but the 358 is a good place to start. Besides, if you ever outgrow it in the studio, it makes a great meter for the bag where ever you go.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2008

Share This Page