Need help.

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by thomaskrewe, Aug 5, 2008.

  1. thomaskrewe

    thomaskrewe TPF Noob!

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    New to the site and to photography, and it seems as though I have an advanced technical question. I'm trying to get some images printed for posters that are 36" in height. The printing company is telling me that the image I provide to them has to be 36" in height and 100ppi. The image that I am sending is 180dpi (which they have told me is the same thing as ppi), but it is obviously not 36" in height. Is the height of the image that can be printed have anything to do with a setting on my camera?

    Thanks for your help in advance.
     
  2. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    36" at 100 ppi means the resolution along that dimension should be at least 3600 pixels. If you do not have 3600 pixels of height you will need to upsize. If you have more than 3600 pixels of height they may want you to downsize, or they may be able to it themselves.

    Always shoot at the maximum resolution settings on the camera as downsizing is easy after the exposure. Up sizing is more troublesome.
     
  3. thomaskrewe

    thomaskrewe TPF Noob!

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    It looks like the highest resolution along that dimension that my camera can produce is 2448. I guess that means that I can only produce an image at 24" in height at 100ppi. Is this resolution number correlated to the amount of megapixels your camera produces?

    Thanks.
     
  4. prodigy2k7

    prodigy2k7 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Yes, height times the width in pixels = megapixels...
    Remember tho: its not all about the megapixels, a 6MP DSLR will probably produce better shots than a 10MP digital compact point and shoot
     

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