Need Help!

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by smile4me, Jan 13, 2006.

  1. smile4me

    smile4me TPF Noob!

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    I'll try to be brief and simple:

    *I photograph with a Canon 10D with Canon 420 ex flash(thinking of upgrading the flash).

    *Previous photography has been outdoors (horse shows, polo, events)

    *I live in a small community where I see an opportunity to serve photographically if I will expand my horizon a little.

    *I need suggestions on what type of lighting set ups will work best for specialty sessions(portrait), church directory, and maybe school/class.

    *Have no idea what to buy. No local supply dealer to talk shop with.

    I would truly appreciate any direction anyone has to offer. :hail:
    Thanks!
     
  2. smile4me

    smile4me TPF Noob!

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    Aw..Please help!

    30 + views and not one person has an opinion?

    I REALLY need some direction.

    Any one out there have just one tiny moment to spare?
     
  3. Azuth

    Azuth TPF Noob!

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    Assuming you have the space to make yourself a little studio...

    Portrait - you can start with one light and a reflector, you'll probably want a soft box. Two lights will give you a little bit more control for portraits. You'll also want some form of backdrop & stand. I'd suggest strobes simply because of the heat factor, but if you don't want to spend the money on them you can get good results with fairly cheep fixed lights. You'll also need a light / flash meter.

    You can get lighting setups that are designed to be portable, either running on batteries or requiring mains but desgined so everything packs neatly for travel. This would be good for school photo's, but for indoor class photo's you're going to want serious lights.

    I'm assuming you don't want lense advice here..
     
  4. photogoddess

    photogoddess TPF Noob!

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    I too have a 10D and a 420 flash (also want to upgrade). I shoot horse shows, weddings and portraits and I rarely use the flash as I prefer natural light with a bounce as needed (portraits). When I do studio work, I have a Novatron 1000VR light set up. 3 lights with stands and umbrellas. The power pack is adjustable to 250/500/1000 watt seconds. Unfortunately I get an error 99 code with my 10D (it's a common thing apparently) unless I use pocket wizards so lately for my studio stuff I've used my boyfriend's Nikon D70. I also have a background stand and a couple of muslins. Honestly, I rarely use the studio stuff but if you're shooting school photos, you will likely need one.
     
  5. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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  6. smile4me

    smile4me TPF Noob!

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    Photogoddess - I've never gotten an error 99 before. Where does it appear and what does it mean?
    thanks - Ash


     
  7. smile4me

    smile4me TPF Noob!

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    thanks Rob for the link. I'm headed over to the site to check things out there.

    Thanks Azuth - I have the meter and the lenses, I just needed some help with the indoor lighting. I agree with you about the strobes vs. continuous. It's hot enough where I live anyway. I don't need any extra heat making the subjects uncomfortable.

    Thank you all for getting the ball rolling!!! I really needed this help.
     
  8. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    If you find yourself photographing children a lot, I think learning to use available light becomes an even stronger recommendation. They don't like sitting still, and being able to capture them while they act natural will give you the best shots. For more formal work, a light setup is a very good bet.
     

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