Need negs but don't mind a wait?

Discussion in 'Alternative Techniques & Photo Gallery' started by cal_gundert05, Dec 7, 2006.

  1. cal_gundert05

    cal_gundert05 TPF Noob!

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    Could you just shoot a roll, then store it in the dark until it expires (longer for good measure), then take out the film and VOILA, negs?
     
  2. Flash Harry

    Flash Harry TPF Noob!

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    processing is best done immediately after exposure but I have stored shot film in the fridge for over a month afterwards with no effect on quality, but after taking from the fridge leave at room temp for 24 hours before processing.
    ps. I wouldn't be waiting till the film reaches expiry date however
     
  3. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    I don't know i process film now and then, that I find in old cameras, some of it well over fifty years old. It seems to do okay. Try that with a smart card.
     
  4. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    It *almost* sounds like you're asking if the latent image will appear, VOILA, without the introduction of chemistry, if you wait long enough. If that's the question, the answer is No.
     
  5. cal_gundert05

    cal_gundert05 TPF Noob!

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    This thread is mostly B.S., but I was thinking that the expiration date is the time when the film stops being responsive to light (the chemicals are "dead").

    Oooohhh, wait.

    I was thinking that this is the same as "fixing" the film so it can be viewed in visible light. But I forgot about the actual developing BEFORE the fixing (the most important part).

    My bad. [me wishing I could just erase this thread]
     
  6. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Film begins to degrade as soon as it is made. The expiration date is the manufacturer's estimate of the date at which the film will still perform at its rated ISO with no serious degradation of the image [density and color.] Film will still perform well for several years after the date of expiration if stored at a low temperature.

    Exposed film will also degrade with time. While the latent image will still be there, the fog level of the film will increase, reducing image contrast.
     

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