Need some advice on stellar/planetary photography....

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Aviation&Hockey, Feb 22, 2007.

  1. Aviation&Hockey

    Aviation&Hockey TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2007
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Greenville, NC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    My new camera has a pretty good zoom on it (as far as i'm concerned) and I ahve been trying out some pics of the night sky....the only one i have on my computer right now is this one...

    [​IMG]

    of the moon and venus. I have some closer shots of both, but they are still on my camera. I will put them up asap.

    I am curious as to what kind of settings to work with to get the best shots. Any tips?
     
  2. Patrice

    Patrice No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2006
    Messages:
    2,392
    Likes Received:
    381
    Location:
    Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada
    I'm interested in the answer to this as well. Last night I tried my first astro photo - D70, 85mm at f1.4, piggyback on an unguided EG5 mount. A 30 second exposure of the Pleides turned out horrible - you can about see the grouping but the whole frame is completely overwhelmed by a bright pinkish tint. Same thing on a 30 second. Next time I get a clear sku I'll try a few more combinations and post the results. Maybe some of the other members have some experience with astro photos. I did get some good views of Saturn and some it's moons around 9:00 pm local, but no pictures.

    When and from where did you take the photo? At this time of year in the N hemisphere for that to be Venus I would think your photo was taken in the morning looking west.
     
  3. sothoth

    sothoth TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2006
    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    0
  4. Aviation&Hockey

    Aviation&Hockey TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2007
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Greenville, NC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    actually, it was at sunset...well, right after it. here are some pics i got of venus and the moon.....

    [​IMG]

    Venus:
    [​IMG]

    i am not mounting my camrea on a telescope, these are directly form the camera lens. getting the stars to focus is hard, but i think if i go out of town i can get some good ones....
     
  5. astrostu

    astrostu Guest

    It all depends upon what kinds of shots you're going for. Just conjunctions, like Moon-Venus, or moon shots, or what?
     
  6. Aviation&Hockey

    Aviation&Hockey TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2007
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Greenville, NC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    pretty much just going to be individual bodies.....I only have 8 sec of shutter speed for max, so i cant get any start-path shots.....

    here is an interesting shot i got today....its right at sunset, so its too bright to catch the surface features, but you can see the shimmering edge

    [​IMG]
     
  7. astrostu

    astrostu Guest

    For the moon, short exposures in manual mode are necessary. Your camera has no idea how to deal with the extreme contrast of a bright object against a dark sky and it will over-expose the shot. That being said, if you are using as much zoom as you appear to be in the above shot, exposures as long as 1/30 or 1/60 sec might be necessary, so you should use a tripod.

    People on these forums will tell you to stop down the aperture some to like an f/9, but I have no idea why. The shorter the exposure you can get, the better because it will be less blurry due to any motion of the camera and especially motion of the atmosphere. So open the aperture as much as possible (hence manual mode), meaning the lowest f-number.

    I don't know if you're using a point-and-shoot or an SLR. If a point-and-shoot, just set the focus to infinity. If an SLR, do the same, but in my experience, lenses have a slightly different idea of what in-focus at infinity means if they're at (for example) 70 mm vs 300 mm on the same lens. So some fiddling around might be necessary.

    To get any resolution (be able to view any detail) on other objects, you're in general out of luck unless you're shooting through a telescope. One thing you can do is use the largest possible zoom and an exposure of around 5 seconds will allow you to see Jupiter (over-exposed) and its four main moons (Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto).

    Edited to add: As for ISO, you should set it to the lowest possible setting (usually 50 or 100). This will force you to take a longer exposure, but a low ISO for astrophotography is a necessity because a high ISO will add a lot of noise to the image.
     
  8. Aviation&Hockey

    Aviation&Hockey TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2007
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Greenville, NC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Moon with following settings:
    1/800, f/8.0, -1.5, ISO 80, Zoom 10X optical, 2X digital

    [​IMG]

    Venus with the following settings:
    8 seconds shutter speed, f/3.4, -2.0, ISO 80, Zoom 10X optical, 5X digital

    [​IMG]
     
  9. EOS_JD

    EOS_JD TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2007
    Messages:
    1,698
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    The small sensor on that Kodak is producing a lot of noise too.

    Aviation
    You have metered for the dark sky so the meter has way overexposed the brighter foreground.
     
  10. Aviation&Hockey

    Aviation&Hockey TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2007
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Greenville, NC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    i thought the pics looked wonderful....they were taken at sunset, so the not-completely-dark sky is due to that. it was done on purpose. what do you suggest?
     
  11. Aviation&Hockey

    Aviation&Hockey TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2007
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Greenville, NC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    ok here is a new one.....

    [​IMG]
     
  12. PetersCreek

    PetersCreek TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    239
    Likes Received:
    4
    Much better! Being able to see the ejecta rays around Tycho is a pretty good indication that the exposure is on the money. They're among the first details to go when you overexpose. (Assuming you have the optics to get 'em in the first place.)

    Since it's a sunlit object, the "Sunny 16 Rule" is usually a pretty good starting point for photographing the full Moon. At ISO 80, that'd be about 1/60s @ f/16 but then you may need to open up a stop or so to get it dialed in.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

astrophotography with a kodak z650

,

astrophotography with kodak z650

,

astrophotography with z650

,

how to photograph the sky with a kodak z650

,

kodak z650 moon photo setting

,

kodak z650 night sky photography

,

zodak z650 night sky settings