neutral density filter - how do they work

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by mfacer, May 3, 2005.

  1. mfacer

    mfacer TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    hey...

    I have tried taking a few "bulb" mode shots with my 20d - usually of water falls etc.... but of course they all just come out white!

    I assume I need a Neutral Density filter? Is so, what "x" do I need... there appear to be 2x 4x etc..... I have a 4x for an old camera but never got to use it really.....

    how exactly do they work, and what sort of conditions and settings would one typically use it with?

    thanks for any info :)
     
  2. lazarus219

    lazarus219 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2004
    Messages:
    215
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Port Macquarie
    a neutral density filter is quite simple, it cuts out light down to a certain amount, basically a x8 will give you 8 more stops to use with your shutter/aperture, which means longer expsures, i assume you want the creamy effect of water which an ND8 will be able to give you but you cvould use something lighter,
    There are also graduated ND filters which are usually more useful for most shots,
     
  3. mfacer

    mfacer TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    I see.... so if I were to leave the shutter open for 4 seconds, it would effectively be the same as leaving it open for 0.5 seconds? (8x)

    Makes sense!
    Thanks :)
     
  4. mentos_007

    mentos_007 The Freshmaker!

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2004
    Messages:
    9,325
    Likes Received:
    102
    Location:
    Poland, Sz-n
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I'll show you:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    those two shots were taken with NDx4 filter (f9, 1/10 sec) in the midday/ full sun.
    What is more you can brilliantly play with a DOF because it allows you to open the apperture more in the midday. :D
    And as you see in the photos above ND filters do not make any difference to colours, so it is worth buying :D
     
  5. ferny

    ferny TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2004
    Messages:
    8,115
    Likes Received:
    64
  6. mfacer

    mfacer TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    cool - thanks guys!!

    which would you recommend? Should I get a x4 and an x8?
     
  7. lazarus219

    lazarus219 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2004
    Messages:
    215
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Port Macquarie
    thanks for the link ferny :)

    I actually knew what ND filters did and everything, but not what the numbers meant and when i went into a shop to find a graduated ND filter the only thing they had was x8 which he told me meant 8 stops (i didnt actually ask he just told me) so i just assumed that was right because i didn't know any better and the shop seemed like a decent photography based shop, its bad now how many shops have people with no idea in them, especially when it makes me screw up and give people wrong advice. sorry!,
     
  8. Contra|Brett|

    Contra|Brett| TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2004
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    0
    almost, with an 8 stop filter you would leave it open 2 min 8 seconds or 128 seconds.

    for that effect however, your meter reading would be something like 1/250 so 8 stops down is

    1/125
    1/60
    1/30
    1/15
    1/8
    1/4
    1/2
    1

    tada, one second shutter speed.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
how do nd filters work
,

how do neutral density filters work

,
how do neutral density filters works
,
how do the work neutral density
,
how does a neutral density filter work
,
how it works neutral density filter
,
how neutral density filter works
,
how neutral density work
,
how they work neural density filters
,
what number neutral density filter do you need