NEW CAMERA (HELP)

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by photokid, Feb 1, 2009.

  1. photokid

    photokid TPF Noob!

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    hi all...

    i was recently given a camera. it's a Cannon camera and it says "EOS Rebel S II" on the front. also came with two lenses.

    has anyone here used this camera?

    also, i'm looking to achieve some black and white photos similar to think i've included below.

    Ross Halfin - AC DC

    can i achieve these types of photos with this camera?

    any info would be great.

    thanks.
     
  2. chrisburke

    chrisburke TPF Noob!

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    style of photo has nothing to do with your camera, it has to do with understanding how to use it... read the manual for it if you have it, if not, google it, I'm sure there is a manual online...
     
  3. beni_hung

    beni_hung TPF Noob!

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    Oh geez. Buy a book lol But your camera should do just fine for you.
     
  4. Ptyler22

    Ptyler22 TPF Noob!

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    That's a great camera, don't obsess over your gear, that camera is exellent, you can take whatever style pictures you want with it, NOW GET OUT THERE AND START TAKING PICTURES!!!!!!!!!!! Oh ya, AND HAVE FUN DOING IT TOO!!
     
  5. R9R Photography

    R9R Photography TPF Noob!

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    Remember the camera is a tool, part of the photographer's means of expressing themselves. I'm not a Canon guy but the name sounds familiar as a good setup. The trick is to read a lot and shoot as much as you can. Play with all the settings, and notice how the affect the images. There's plenty to be learned here, but it really hits home when you put it into practice.

    Happy shooting!
     
  6. photokid

    photokid TPF Noob!

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    thanks guys.

    i posted this next question a while back but didnt write down the exact answers...

    which type of black and white film is the best for really gritty photos? im assuming that has to do with the film AND developing?

    or mainly just the film?
     
  7. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    By 'gritty' I assume you mean 'grainy'. In other words, an image in which you can see the grains or particles of silver which make up the image on the negative.*

    There are several things you can do to make the final print image grainier. The first is to begin with a fast [high iso number] film. Kodak's Tri-X [ISO 400] comes to mind here. There may be others even faster.

    Next, if you are willing to pursue this further, think in terms of big enlargements. The more you enlarge an image, the more you enlarge the grain and the more it will show in the final print. You can compose a picture so that only the center area will form the final picture, enlarge it and then, when mounting, matte so that only the central area remains. Unfortunately, if you're using commercial enlarging services, this can be something of a budget-buster. If you do your own enlarging, it's not a problem.

    If you wish to go further, you might consider developing your own film [Ed. There's a series of articles on b&w here on TPF. One of them deals with film developing.] By chosing a very energetic developer, you can increase the tendency of silver grains to 'clump', for lack of better word, during development.

    As an aside, do look at some of the pinhole camera pictures posted on this site. Are these images similar to what you're looking for? If so, pinhole photography's an interesting thing to fuss about with.

    *Of course, if by 'gritty' you mean the harshly lit, contrasty pictures linked in your IP, that's another matter entirely. That effect is due to lighting and the choice of high contrast while making the print.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2009

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