New film

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by Sideburns, Jan 13, 2008.

  1. Sideburns

    Sideburns TPF Noob!

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    Ok, so not new to you guys...but new to me.
    I just bought a roll of Ilford Pan-F Plus and a roll of Fuji Velvia 100F. Now, I'm pretty darn excited for both, but I'm also worried because I know both films usually have a pretty small tolerance for exposure latitude.

    Now I want to make sure of something. I'm pretty sure my camera overexposes by a stop. (compared to the meter on my digital camera). However, from prints, that are overexposed 2 stops, walmart made pretty darn good pics...(Fuji Superia X-Tra 400).

    Now, I want to make sure I expose these new films correctly, because together they cost about 21 bucks for the two rolls. (stupid canada).

    I've heard to shoot Pan-F Plus slightly under, around 32? But if my camera exposes a stop over, would I not set my speed 1/3 slower than 100? And the Velvia 100F is supposed to be right on...so would I not expose at ASA 200?

    I'm just making sure I'm not confused and I'm doing it right. That stuff is expensive to buy, and probably even more so to process.

    Anyone use these films and have some tips? What should I avoid shooting with both?
     
  2. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I can only address the Pan F as i don't use color film.

    One rule of thumb is to shoot at half the box speed, which is over exposing to ensure that you get enough shadow detail.

    I suggest you try half a roll at the box speed, leave a blank and shoot the rest of the film at half the ISO.
    See which gives you the best results.

    Usually slide film is exposed 1/3 of a stop under to increase saturation. However, you need to test for yourself to see what the results will be for you equipment .

    Meter vary from camera to camera; hard to believe, but can be true.

    there is no way to avoid testing to determine what works. testing meaning trying to see what works best for you.
     
  3. Sideburns

    Sideburns TPF Noob!

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    Well I kinda figured that was gonna be the verdict(test)...but I just wanted to be close....and with such expensive film, I can't exactly afford to test much.
    Thanks though, for your recommendations.
     
  4. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    Bracket, bracket, and bracket.
     
  5. Sideburns

    Sideburns TPF Noob!

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    What if I take em in, and the lab has their way with em? Won't they make them all the same exposure?
     
  6. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    If you are planning on taking them to Walmart, then that is your first mistake. Find a pro lab. They shouldn't make any corrections unless you specifically ask.
     
  7. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    PanF shows beautiful results at ISO 25-50. In my experience, the blacks are extremely rich in any developer, but can get too contrasty for my tastes in some. I prefer it in non t-grain developers at lower temps to maximize its shadow capabilities. I've run it through hot TMAX dev once and while the results were really punchy, the highlights blew out a bit.
     
  8. Sideburns

    Sideburns TPF Noob!

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    My plan was to bring them to Henry's and ask them who they use...cause they send em out. Alternatively, I would have to search...but will not bring thsese to walmart...too expensive for that.

    Ahhh. Thank you very much Max. I was hoping to see you, because I have liked what I've seen from your B&W shots, and you were actually my inspiration for buying Pan-F if you remember.
     
  9. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    Well I wish you the best of luck. It's probably my favorite black and white film that's still in production. Fuji's Neopan Acros 100 takes a close second. All of my own favorite b&w's have been shot on those two. Some people have claimed that the true EI of PanF is around 32. Maybe, maybe not. I do think it can flatten out a bit when pulled, but then again I'm a big fan of contrast. I also think it's one of the few Ilford films that doesn't show significantly better results in staining developers (as opposed to Delta, mostly), which will take some pressure off you for being lazy. There are a lot of times that I know I could get better results in certain situation by using a staining developer but I just can't be troubled to do it, especially if I'm in a huge rush and it's easier to just drop it by the lab. I like the fact that PanF is so versatile and easy to work with.
     

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