New here to TPF..Tell me what you think.

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by TelekinesisKeith, Feb 21, 2009.

  1. TelekinesisKeith

    TelekinesisKeith TPF Noob!

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    Here are a couple of pictures I took while at the beach one night. Feel free to say whatever you think.

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  2. FrankLamont

    FrankLamont TPF Noob!

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    Your pictures can be resized, you know.

    Nonetheless... get your angles correct, firstly. If you did it on purpose, it has to stand out, and these don't.

    You need to balance light...

    But some interesting aspects as well.
     
  3. t4ct1c4lr3m1x

    t4ct1c4lr3m1x TPF Noob!

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    I like these pictures. I think the angles are appealing.
     
  4. I think you're on to a direction that has a lot of potential. The colors are nice, night time lends itself to deeper saturation. The framing and composition is ok, very straight forward. Consider taking a specific element and making it the subject of the shot. Right now these are nice backgrounds, but let's put something in front. I mean that respectfully - there's nothing wrong with landscapes and architecture, but it will still require the image to have a specific composition - put something in the foreground, find a middle layer, and then a sweeping, contextual background. The hot dog sign is too big (and a little boring) but something obviously about sun and daylight shot in the middle of the night might make for an interesting visual juxtaposition.

    Technically, these images are over-exposed. The first image almost makes the sand look like dirty snow. It might be enough for it to be barely visible as sand... let it be dark! The buildings look day-time bright, there's no need for that... unless of course that's a creative choice you're making.

    Your camera is metering to try and find an average light amount. But it's night time, and you might consider making that part of the shot's atmosphere. Again, it's ok for it to be dark, after all it's the middle of the night. So see what the camera suggests, and then shorten the exposure. Try several exposures till you see what works. If you're working in Aperture Priority mode, make the exposure as suggested by the camera, and then switch to manual. Use the same aperture. So if it had proposed f/11 at 30 seconds, got to M, set it to f/8, and bring the exposure time down to 10 seconds, or 8 or 15... try 'em all.

    The last image is doing something weird with the blue light from the window. Lens flare. Is there a filter at the front of the lens? Take it off for night time work. Most people put them on for protection, but only the best (most expensive) filters work well, which becomes apparent at night and during long exposures. You don't need the protection when mounted on a tripod.

    Have fun. Stay warm - it gets chilly at night, which impedes creativity. Bring a small flash light to work the camera. Put the lens hood on, it will keep oddly-angled light off the lens.
     

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