New to film here!

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by JbleezyJ, Sep 3, 2010.

  1. JbleezyJ

    JbleezyJ TPF Noob!

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    but not to digital. Anyways I'm taking a black and white class this semester at college and I just bought a Nikon N80 SLR.

    I'm curious on what kind of film/brand I should buy for this? Not sure if this is the place to ask. Also I love macro photography and would love to maybe do some film black and whites but I went through my old macro work and just slapped a black and white preset over it to see what it may turn out to be like and usually all my macro shots would be too dark in black and white but not in color. I mean digitally I could adjust that and make it brighter and such. If I take these macro shots in film and process them in the darkroom would I have the same problem of too dark a photo?
     
  2. Josh66

    Josh66 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I've always liked Fuji Neopan SS 100, Freestyle has it for $3 a roll.

    That wouldn't be my first choice for macro though (too grainy) - I love it for portraits though.

    For macro, you'll probably want something with finer grain... I don't really know what to suggest for that... :( (Maybe Fuji Acros 100...?)

    With good metering, you shouldn't have any darkness problems... Also, you should be able to 'fix it' in the darkroom if there are any problems...
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2010
  3. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    you might check with your insturtor to see if they have some recommendations for what you will be using in class

    you will have issues in the darkroom if the negatives are underexposed similar as with digital but also different
     
  4. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Yeah... that's what I'm thinking. It's got me wondering... we are talking through-the-lens metering, aren't we?

    -Pete
     
  5. Josh66

    Josh66 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I am, lol. Can't speak for the OP...
     
  6. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Well... like I say, it got me wondering since I've not done any macro work with a SLR. Is it possible to experience "bellows factor" with a macro focusing lens?
     
  7. Josh66

    Josh66 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    You know, I'm not sure... I guess it would depend on the camera...?

    Any light changes due to close focusing should be automatically accounted for by the in camera meter, right?
     
  8. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Right. IF he's metering through-the-lens. See what I mean?
     
  9. Josh66

    Josh66 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I get you now. I'm going to assume that the OP is using the in-camera meter, but I guess we'll have to wait for clarification to be sure...
     
  10. JbleezyJ

    JbleezyJ TPF Noob!

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    I just use matrix metering in my camera when doing macro digitally.
     
  11. djacobox372

    djacobox372 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The two most popular B/W films are kodak tmax, and fujifilm neopan acros
     
  12. conorg

    conorg TPF Noob!

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    Yeh I agree that fuji neopan SS 100 would be a good choice to use, and best of all is relatively cheap :thumbup:
     

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