New to Macro Newb Question

Discussion in 'Macro Photography' started by jbylake, Aug 28, 2009.

  1. jbylake

    jbylake Dodging the Men in Black Supporting Member

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    I want to try some macro with my film cameras (2 AE1 and 1 A1). I have a 80 to 200mm zoom/macro, but really don't like the idea of that much lens hanging off the front. I was considering buying one of these:
    Canon Macro Lens FD 50mm f/3.5 S.S.C.

    from a reputable dealer on ebay.
    Can you tell me which would be more useful, the zoom/macro or the 50mm lens. Also, I have no idea what S.S.C. (stamped on the front of the housing means. Any and all input appreciated, or other ideas than those mentioned.

    Thanks Ahead for your time.

    J.:D
     
  2. Dao

    Dao No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    [FONT=Arial, verdana, helvetica, geneva]S.S.C (super spectra coating)[/FONT]
     
  3. Dao

    Dao No longer a newbie, moving up!

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  4. Big

    Big TPF Noob!

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    I use the EF 100mm 2.8 USM Macro lens. I love the working distance but of course it wouldn't work in your application. Other than that, 100mm is great. I read a lot of people use lenses with that focal range for macro give or take a few mm's...
     
  5. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Hmm I suspect that the 80-200mm macro zoom lens is not a full macro lens. A lot of zoom lenses have the lable macro in their name as a marketing move - it basicaly means that the lens can focus close, but in the macro world its not enough. Typically these lenses will get to around 1:2 magnification (that is the image on the sensor will be half the size it is in the real world) whilst full macro is 1:1 (the image on the cameras sensor is the same size as it is in real life).

    Also as to your point of "having that much lens hanging off the front) when using a longer lens your left hand should be supporting the lens barrel anyway - further the heavier longer lenses will come with a tripod collar, which you can use instead of the cameras tripod connection point - so that you have a more even distribution of the weight.
    In addition, whilst I am not well versed in the film camera market, I do have a 400D canon camera (entry level so not that tough) and it can easily take a heavy 70-200mm f2.8 lens hanging off the front without problems in the mount.

    As for the macro lens your looking at, again sadly, I don't know the older FD market so I can't cast a comment on its image quality or suitabilty for use. However I can say that if your after insect macro work I do encourage you to try for a longer focal length macro lens. Typically 90mm is the shortest recomended focal length for macro insect work - it gives you a longer working distance (longer distance from the subject to the camera) so that you have far less chance to spook the insect - shorter lenses can certainly work, but its a harder task many times.
     

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