New to wildlife photography

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by guskat, Nov 22, 2003.

  1. guskat

    guskat TPF Noob!

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    Hi Folks

    Just a question that has been bugging me hope one of you kind people can help me

    When focusing on an animal what part of the animal should the main focus point be ?

    ie : the eyes ?
    :the nose ?
    : the part of the body closest to the camera ?

    any help at all would be great

    :salute: GUS
     
  2. Chase

    Chase I am now benign! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Generally speaking, the eyes should always be in focus.
     
  3. carlita

    carlita TPF Noob!

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    yeah obviously there could be times when the emphasis is on a different part of the body and therefore the focus would be cerntered elsewhere, but i would say that most often it should be placed on the eyes.
     
  4. guskat

    guskat TPF Noob!

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    I MEAN THAT GUYS

    That was my gut feeling but as a newcomer its always good to have a second opinon

    :lol: :lol: :lol:

    CHEERS !!!
    GUS
     
  5. christopher

    christopher TPF Noob!

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    focus on the nose and have a more then shallow depth of field.
     
  6. Mitica100

    Mitica100 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The eyes have it! However, there are many circumstances where you need to take in consideration the depth of field and how much sharpness you want in that picture. Say a cat sits and its paws are several inches closer to the camera. Focusing on the eyes assures one of sharpness around the head. Using a hyperfocal method (although isn't much of an use in close-ups) will give you more sharpness. So, in all fairness, you have to adjust to the situation. Hope this didn't confuse you... :roll:
     
  7. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Learning about DOF may be easier with a fixed focal length lens which has a depth of field scale on the lens. You can focus on the farthest part of your subject that you want in focus, consult the focus scale to determine it's distance. Then focus on the closest part of your subject to determine it's distance. Once you know the closest and farthest distances of the DOF you want you can use the DOF scale to determine an aperture and where you should actually focus to get everything you want.

    This may seem too complicated to use with fast moving wildlife, but with experience you'll know where to hyperfocus quickly to get what you want and you'll be able to set your camera to the correct focus much of the time long before you even see your subject.

    I don't shoot much wildlife, but I photograph bands in bars. They are always moving around, I'm moving around, and it's too dark to see through the camera to focus precisely, so I use the focusing and DOF scale. I can situate myself, see where the singer is, see where the drummer is, set the camera to the proper hyper focal distance to get both, and shoot away.
     
  8. Mitica100

    Mitica100 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Matt, couldn't put it any better!

    One must keep in mind also that wide angle lenses have more DOF than a regular lens and more so, than a tele lens. Wildlife photography involves primarily the use of tele lenses. That's why is so critical to have the lens 'prefocused' and the aperture/shutter speed ready to go.
     
  9. joelackey92

    joelackey92 TPF Noob!

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    Yes, the eyes should be the focus point or the entire face in general.
     
  10. Joves

    Joves No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Really it depends on the target and your distance from the target. If you have a fairly stationary target then sure the eyes or face area will work. If the target is moving then forget the face, it wont work, then the body is where the focus is. In the case of moving tagets I use higher ISOs, stop down and a shutter speed of 1/250 or more. Also depends on if you are shooting from your hands or support and wether you are hidden well. Personally I wear my ghillies suit and creep around so I shoot handheld alot.
     
  11. Formatted

    Formatted TPF Noob!

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    New record this is a 8 year old thread!
     
  12. Joves

    Joves No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Hell I didnt even notice when the first post was made, I just saw it was responded to yesterday. SHows how often I come in here anymore.
     

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