***Newbie Alert*** Fundemental Camera Question

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Ninja-Wadzi, Mar 8, 2004.

  1. Ninja-Wadzi

    Ninja-Wadzi TPF Noob!

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    Hello,

    I've decided to take a serious approach to photography. I've absolutely no refined skill as this goes but I'm pretty sure I have the eye for it. I'll be absorbing any information I can find on techniques and styles, but in the meantime, I'd like you all to supply me with a bit of information about my first 'serious' camera purchase.

    I'm working on a budget with not a lot of breathing space. Not to say that I want a cheap camera, but I'd definitely like to be pointed to a camera that is versitile as possible and durable. Unfortunately I'm a clumsy as hell. A digital camera seems logical since it requires no film, but how does it stand up to standard cameras in terms of style and capabilities? Would you recommend film or digital? In either case, please recommend specific models to me?

    I'm not sure if this issue hasnt been beaten to death, if its against the rules, my apologies. I did read a previous thread about the cameras you guys had but it didnt help in terms of specificity.

    Thanks in advance,
    Ninja W.
     
  2. MDowdey

    MDowdey Guest

    hi ninja!!!

    it all depends on what aspect of photography you are interested in. If you want to learn about film and developing and stuff like that...a Good film SLR is the way to go.. some models would be the nikon n75, the canon rebel series, and the pentax k series(???).

    If you are computer savvy and want to tie that into photography then a digital would do it. nikon coolpix 5400, 5700. canon digital rebel....

    lots of choices, easier to narrow it down by what you need out of a camera. hope this helps

    md
     
  3. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Digital will cost you the most up front.

    You can get started more inexpensively in film, but in the long run it will cost you as much or more than digital.

    If you can afford the Digital Rebel or other DSLR, then that is probably a great way to start out. As a beginner it's probably more important to be able to take lots of pics, and experiment, than which particular medium you choose. Film tends to discourage beginners from taking lot's of practice shots because it's so expensive to process, print, etc...

    On the other hand, I love film, and I would hate to discourage you from going there if you want to.
     
  4. Ninja-Wadzi

    Ninja-Wadzi TPF Noob!

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    Actually, it'd probably be best to recommend from both aspects. Since this is a new thing for me, I don't know which I'd be best at or most comfortable with. I am in fact computer savvy and pick up using programs fairly easily. So adapting to digital wouldnt be a problem at all.

    The more information I have, the better. Film or digital. Thank you for responding so quickly and amicably. :)
     
  5. MDowdey

    MDowdey Guest

    hi ninja... just another thought...


    how much money are you wanting to pay?


    md
     
  6. photogoddess

    photogoddess TPF Noob!

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    Since taking pictures is like eating potato chips - "you can't just take one"... :D The most cost effective route to try both digital and film is to buy a camera(s) that uses the same lenses for both digital and film camera bodies. I have a Canon 10D (the Digital Rebel would probably be good for you) and a Canon Rebel 2000. They both use the same lenses (and many accessories) so I didn't have to spend quite as much. Check out eBay. There are some great deals to be found there.
     
  7. Ninja-Wadzi

    Ninja-Wadzi TPF Noob!

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    I really don't want to limit myself, to be honest. This is something I'm willing to fully invest in. I just want to do it as carefully as possible so I don't have to back-track in terms of purchases. Lets assume money is no issue for now. The more I learn about the best specs the more I can decide what I can or cant live without. I'm not out to buy it tomorrow so I'll think hard on it before I finalize anything.
     
  8. MDowdey

    MDowdey Guest

    well if money is no issue i would get a D2H with a 50mm 1.4

    and a 300mm zoom. all nikor glass by the way...


    :lol: :lol: :lol:

    md
     
  9. metroshane

    metroshane TPF Noob!

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    I was pawn shopping today and saw several Canon Rebels in the $59 range. Not bad considering they came with @50mm lenses.
     
  10. photogoddess

    photogoddess TPF Noob!

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    Shane, I wish I had a pawn shop in my area that sold camera gear that cheap! Great idea though.

    Ninja, just make sure that you take someone who knows about cameras with you. There is lots of junk out there. I used to own a pawn shop and you should have seen the bad camera stuff I had to weed through when I first bought the place. :shock:
     
  11. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    The best way to avoid "back tracking" is to just keep it simple.

    As far as digital goes, the stuff that comes out three years from now will blow the top-o-line stuff today away. I think that in the next ten years we will see DSLR engineering change a lot. Right now everything is still designed from a film camera base, and I think that will start to change. Much of the way a film camera is designed has to do with the need to hold a roll of film. No need to stick to that with digital, but they are still doing it because we are familiar with the way a camera is supposed to look. Personally, I think all digital sensors should be round. Lenses project round images; the reason we shoot rectangles and squares is because round is wasteful for film. Shoot the full image circle, crop it in Adobe PS.

    I don't even think it's very wise to think that Canon or Nikon or whoever won't have a major lens change coming up soon. Why stick to 35mm parameters? Eventually they will have a sensor with more resolution than LF film that is way smaller than a 35mm frame. It will use smaller lenses. I mean Canon already changes about once every 15 years, and it's been 30 years since Nikon's last major lens mount change. They are due.

    On the other hand, whatever you buy today, film or digital, will do exactly the same thing it does today 5 years from now. just go simple, learn what's up, and when it comes time for a change, you can assess what's up with new tech then.
     
  12. doxx

    doxx TPF Noob!

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    there is no rule and no absolute answer to your question -
    photography is a diverse craft - it's always a compromise
    between your vision, your gear, and your personal preference.
    Finally it's about the result - the picture you want to take. Film
    and digital are equal quality-wise, but it's a different experience...

    Every system has it's pros and cons and gives you a different
    experience of photography. I use film and digital cameras
    and they are just different cats. For b/w I prefer film - if I want
    color, or need immediate results (especially in the studio) I prefer
    digital.

    Also, you'll be able to take great pictures with decent equipment,
    on the other hand you can find yourself taking bad pictures with
    high end equipment...

    I can't possibly tell you what's right or wrong, but for starters
    I'd suggest a digital camera, since you can check the results
    right away at no additional cost (the gear is more expensive
    though). If you're serious about photography - look for a
    camera that gives you full manual control as well, the brand/
    make does not matter as long as you like the handling.

    I hope this is not too confusing - happy shooting
     

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