Newbie & Developing..

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by K_Pugh, Apr 28, 2008.

  1. K_Pugh

    K_Pugh No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Hi,

    Sorry, i did have a question but i found the answer. Why waste space though, maybe yous could give me quick answers to another question, especially folk in the UK.. before i start searching the forum/internet.

    I'm looking to shoot B&W and do the developing myself so that i can scan the negatives into the computer.

    1. Short list of the basic equipment i need?
    2. Where to purchase the chemicals and equipment?
    3. Quick run-down on the process?

    Thanks,

    Kev. (totally new to film and developing, of course)
     
  2. joyride

    joyride TPF Noob!

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    Well, I dont know exacty where you could buy from, as I use local store. there are several opnline retailers though. As for the run down on things you need, I will give you everything I use. im sure Helen and the other darkroom pros will be far more informative than I.

    1. Developing tank w/ reels
    2. 1000 ml graduated cylinder
    3. changing bag OR dark room (I use a windowless bathroom at night)
    4. thermometer
    5. Running water
    6. Five 1 L chemical storage bottles

    chemicals: (what I use in parenthesis)
    1. film developer (Kodak D-76)
    2. Stop bath (Kodak indicator stop bath)
    3. Fixer (Kodafix)
    4. Hypoclear agent (no idea, but I need to get more) this is optional, but saves a ton ofo time on washing.
    5. wetting agent (phot-flo)

    As for the process, it is all going to depend based on film, temperature, and chemicals that you buy.

    Check out the "how to develop" thread in this forum, it has some good pointers http://thephotoforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=30670
     
  3. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The following is a basic list of items needed to process black and white negative roll film. This list is based on my gear and you may find items that you do not need as well as find that you may have a need for items not listed herein. There are still some photographic stores that carry darkroom gear around but not many. You may find yourself needing to resort to the online camera houses for supplies.

    Developer stock solution (needs to be mixed) or …
    Developer working solution (ready to be used)
    Stop bath stock solution
    Fixing agent stock solution
    3- gallon jugs (for storage of working solutions of chemicals)
    3 or more 8-ounce glass amber bottles (for storage of stock solutions of chemicals)
    Film drying agent (for shortening drying time)
    A practice roll of film (to practice loading film into the developing tank)
    16-ounce lightproof developing tank (available in either stainless steel or plastic)
    1-120 roll film developing reel
    2-35mm roll film developing reel
    A pair of scissors
    A can opener
    A 32-ounce graduated measuring cup
    A 250 mL graduated cylindrical measure
    2-graduated measure syringes
    A plastic funnel
    3-16-ounce containers (to hold chemicals for processing)
    Instant dial thermometer (for regulating water temperature)
    30 or 60-minute timer that measures in seconds and minutes
    Wire or string (for hanging film to dry)
    Stainless steel hanging clips or wooden clothespins (for hanging and holding film straight)
    Negative archival storage sheets

    If you decide to work with stock solutions in your chemicals then you won’t have need for the gallon jugs as you will probably be mixing the chemicals on an as needed basis. However if you are going to keep plenty of stock on hand , regardless of whether or not you are using a working solution, I would still suggest using the amber bottles for chemicals storage.
    A darkroom has only one requirement. It must be light tight. Absolutely. You can have a dedicated darkroom that serves this function on a full time basis. You can convert a bathroom or kitchen to this purpose. You can even use a changing bag and a closet with a slop bucket. A darkroom should be able to fill your personal needs. I would like to point out that I think running water and proper air circulation to be a must when considering a darkroom. And if you are going to be doing processing as well as printing you should have enough room or at least a means to keep your wet and dry processes separated.
     
  4. K_Pugh

    K_Pugh No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Sorry for the delay guys, thanks for the replies and good advice.

    I bought all the equipment & chemicals that i needed the other day.. i just couldn't get a wetter.

    I quickly fired off a roll of HP5 tonight and the negs are hanging to dry as we speak (or, as i type rather).. i used distilled water on the final 2 rinses to hopefully minimise water marks as i didn't have a wetter.

    Will scan the negs tomorrow after i get back from work and post the results.

    Kev.
     
  5. K_Pugh

    K_Pugh No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Here's the pics i promised. I quickly just shoot off a roll as i wanted to try this asap so the shots are so-so.

    http://www.thephotoforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=121493

    Any feedback very welcomed, any tips or problems that you can see please let me know.

    Kev.

    And thanks again for the help!
     
  6. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Three things. I use tap water. I'm on city water and I simply drink a glass before I go to check for excess chemicals in the water. No problems so far.

    I don't know how you rinse but I use the 5-10-20 method. Saves water and time. Fill tank, agitate five times. Empty, fill, agitate ten times. Empty, fill, agitate tank twenty times. Much quicker.

    And, you should shoot more B&W. Very nice tonal definition in the negs and a lot of contrasting values. You did well.
     
  7. K_Pugh

    K_Pugh No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Hi,

    Thanks for the tips. I just went by the Ilfords method of rinsing. Rinse 10 times each lasting 1 minute. I'll try your method next time though as it does seem like a better, quicker way to go.

    It was my first time at 'looking' in B&W but i guess the more you do it the easier it becomes, or the more you realise what could potentially be an interesting shot.
     
  8. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The biggest thing is to overcome seeing everything in a matter of colors. Look for the relationships of shapes, look for drastic edges between bright and dark. Look for texture and repetition. repetition. repetition. (I know, HAR HAR) It is more of a challenge, not only taking a three dimensional world and successfully translating that onto a two dimensional medium, but now taking that world of color and translating it into one containing only shades of grey. Good luck.
     

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