Newbie: How to develop?

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by Deco, Sep 29, 2004.

  1. Deco

    Deco TPF Noob!

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    Hello I am new to photography.

    I would like to know a brief explanation on how a photo is developed in the darkroom. What chemicals it passes through and for how long.

    That is all I would like to know.

    Thank you. :)
     
  2. hobbes28

    hobbes28 Incredible Supporting Member

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    Hello, and welcome to the forums. I moved your post to the darkroom forum because the regulars here can probably answer your question better.
     
  3. oriecat

    oriecat work in progress

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    Develop the film:

    Edit - pre wash - fill and let it soak for a little bit, dump and refill if it comes out purpley

    Developer - time will vary depending upon the film used and the developer used. Example, I generally use Ilford HP5+ 400 and it develops for 11 minutes in Rodinal at 1:50.

    Stop bath - 30 seconds

    Fixer - depends on the kind of fixer, rapid or non. I generally go 5-6 minutes just to be safe, even tho my rapid fix says it can between 2-4.

    Fill and dump with water 3 times

    Hypo-clear - 2 minutes

    Wash for 10 minutes - edit - I think I only wash for 5 minutes here. Now I can't remember since I'm not doing it...

    Swish in some PhotoFlo for a little bit. I don't time that part myself


    Making a print:

    Developer - After exposing in the enlarger, development times will vary. I usually do mine between 1.5 and 2 minutes.

    Stop Bath - 30 seconds

    Fixer - a couple minutes for RC paper, longer for FB. I don't usually time my fixing, I just leave it in for a while while I do other stuff.

    Wash - 10 minutes for RC paper, 20 or 30? for FB


    This is what I do anyway...
     
  4. gecko

    gecko TPF Noob!

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    u use stop bath in your film developing?
     
  5. oriecat

    oriecat work in progress

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    yeah...
     
  6. gecko

    gecko TPF Noob!

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    ookay
     
  7. oriecat

    oriecat work in progress

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    It's pretty standard practice...
     
  8. gecko

    gecko TPF Noob!

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    i didnt say its wrong

    maybe its a westcoast thing ;-)
     
  9. rangefinder

    rangefinder TPF Noob!

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    The color that oriecat is referring to is the anti-halation backing on the film. Different manufactures may use a different color. Some are purple, red, blue and grey.

    I always prewet a couple of times to ensure the anti-halation backing was removed.

    I'm originally from the east coast. I always used stopbath.

    The anti-halation backing was put on film to absorb light bouncing off the pressure plate. As light strikes the film it passes through the film, hits the pressure plate and is reflected back onto the film. The anti-halation backing absorbs this preventing the film from being exposed a second time.
     
  10. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Here's how I do it...

    Film:

    Load 35mm BW film on to reels and in to developing tank.

    Make sure all solutions are at the same temp (68F is usually recommended).

    Pre-wet (water): 30 sec constant agitation, thump the dev tank on the floor to dislodge air bubbles.

    Developer: agitate for the first 15 sec, and then for 5 sec every 30 sec for the remaining time (varies with film, developer, etc...)

    Stop Bath: 30 sec constant agitation

    Fixer: agitate for at least 10 sec out of every 30 sec. Total fixing time is two times the clearing time. Clearing time is determined by dunking scrap film leader in fix and seeing how long it takes to completely clear (turn transparent).

    Wash (water): 30 sec constant agitation

    Hypo Clear or Wash Aid: 30 sec constant agitation

    Wash (water): 30 sec constant agitation, empty and refill with fresh water, 30 sec constant agitation, repeat for a total of 5 or 6 times or 10 min in film washer

    Photo-Flo: dunked in photo-flo, some minimal agitation

    squeegee with fingers and hang to dry

    Prints:

    expose print

    Developer: 1 min for RC and 2 min for FB, some agitation, I'll usually lift the print out of the developer once or twice

    Stop: 10 to 15 sec, constant agitation

    Fix: I follow the manufacturer's recommendations, 1 to 5 min depending on type of fixer and paper

    Holding Bath (water)

    Wash(water) RC: 10 min, squeegee on glass, lay on drying screen

    Wash(water) FB: 60 min or 10 min in hypo clear, and 30 min wash, squeegee on glass, lay on drying screen


    Stop Bath isn't absolutely necessary with film or prints, but besides halting the developing process, it extends the life of the fixer (which is typically one of the more expensive chems).
     
  11. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    It also keeps the whole roll of film from being fogged when light makes it through the felt trap on a 35mm cassette. Some IR films don't have the anti-halation coating, and that's why it's so important to handle them with care, as a little stray light can fog through the entire roll.
     
  12. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I also will usually rinse several times. I was taught to always pre-wet to help prevent air bells, and to "prime" the emultion for the developer, but I run into lots of folks who consider it completely unnecessary. I figure it doesn't really take that much extra time, and there is all that anti-halation gunk (Forte film rinse water stinks!!), and even if the problems it solves are rare then it's worth it.
     

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