Newbie Photos

Discussion in 'Landscape & Cityscape' started by Cheyenne, Jul 14, 2006.

  1. Cheyenne

    Cheyenne TPF Noob!

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    Ok Guys I am a complete novice at this photography stuff so please be kind but constructive :D

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  2. kilifila66

    kilifila66 TPF Noob!

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    Wow, I must say your choice of shots was quite a bit like mine when I first started. You see something that catches your eye, getting the camera to capture the same thing was always tricky for me. You may not know Hertz Van Rental yet, but he always said to ask myself a few questions.
    Why did you take the picture?
    What are you trying to capture?
    The main thing I would say is you have lots of "dead space." Photo number 2 would be the best one to give you an idea of what I am saying. 90% of your photo is consisting of water. The dock and the shore are not strong enough players to attract the eye because of the water dominating the shot. What are you most interested in capturing there? Secondly there is very little contrast between the color of the sky and the color of the water in a few of the pictures which leads to the same feeling of lots of dead space. My best piece of advice though would be choose your subject you want to focus on and most importantly MOVE IN CLOSER! I used to post pictures and there was always someone saying, that shot is great but move in closer and you will like your results even better. I try to live by that. Also, one other thing that I used often when I was starting out, which I still use now, is the rule of thirds. The human eye likes to see photos broken up into thirds, it has something to do with our perception of symetry. Try taking a shot where there is something different in the lower,center,and upper third of the frame to get a better idea. Your fourth shot shows the most promise of all, I love your framing using the tree's silhouette against the sky showing a hint of red. You also have a great depth of field (or viewing distance) in that photo. I hope these were all helpfull comments for you. I know that once you figure out how to translate what your eye sees to what the camera takes, you will be making some beautiful photos. Keep snapping happy!
     
  3. Cheyenne

    Cheyenne TPF Noob!

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    Thanks so much for your feedback.

    I'm working with a very basic camera at the moment so that doesn't help either (not much zoom etc.) but I definately can improve a whole lot on technique :D

    The pictures taken above are at a beach about five minutes from my house and were taken on dusk. I live on the Mornington Peninsula, in Victoria, Australia and we are in the middle of winter at the moment.

    These pics were taken two day ago. I have a few taken yesterday of jetty and some boats a bit further up the beach and will post those and you can let me know what you think :D

    Thanks again

    Anne
     
  4. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Heya Anne and welcome to ThePhotoForum :D.

    The camera that a photographer uses can be as basic as can be; it is the composition that "makes" a photo in the first place: When you see something nice that attracts your eye you want to frame it so another viewer might find it as interesting as you do, even though he was not there and did not feel what you felt. A photo will never evoke the very same feelings in a viewer as it did in yourself the moment you took the photo, but it should be composed in a manner that it evokes some feelings, some reaction in the viewer. And composition is one great and one very basic means to achieve that.

    And when we look at wide-angle ladscape photography - or seascapes, fot that matter - the famous Rule of Thirds mentioned by kilifila before comes into play. In very wide total views, it is always advisable to look for some sort of foreground. It gives the picture scale and depth. Foreground elements should be in the outer thirds of the frame as not to take away from your scene; it should just add to it.
    Or you go looking for some element that kind of "takes your eyes by the hand", something that leads your eyes into the picture. I guess your photos that include the jetty might do just that, but I haven't viewed those as yet.
    One very important thing for seascape photos is: keep your horizon line level, don't let the water run out of one side of your frame, unless you very deliberately go for a very different angle. That purpose should show immediately, else tilted horizons may well look like a real and true mistake.

    You have decided to join us here on TPF, though, and are brave enough to show us your work, you are willing to learn and therefore I am sure you'll show us some really great shots in no time!
     
  5. Cristel_Brouwer

    Cristel_Brouwer TPF Noob!

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    I like the 4rth one, because of the tree in the pictures.... It gives it a certain contrast.

    Have fun taking pictures !

    Cris
     
  6. Cheyenne

    Cheyenne TPF Noob!

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    LaFoto - Thanks so much for your comments. I really appreciate them. I did indeed join TPF to learn more about photography and understand that my photos do lack anything even remotely resembling structure or purpose. To be honest I didn't really think before I took these pictures but can see how with a little bit of thought and planning that I can make my photos a lot better :D

    I'm definately here to learn so constructive criticism is well received :D

    Chris - Thanks for your comments I'm looking forward to having some better photos to show soon :D

    This is another photo taken the same time as the others posted above. Thinking about what was said, would the photo below be an improvement on the ones above? Please again let me know what you all think :D

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  7. Cristel_Brouwer

    Cristel_Brouwer TPF Noob!

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    No probs...
    Just have fun taking pictures and the rest of it you will learn of the way...

    Have fun!

    Cris
     
  8. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Well, Anne, the new one shows another bit of flaws that I think you don't mind me to mention for you:

    a) you were already running out of light and the camera had to go for long exposure times. Hardly anyone can handhold long exposure times without getting camera shake (and if it is only from you breathing or your heart beating, things that you simply cannot avoid) - so a support for the camera or a tripod are essential for dusk and nighttime photography. No postporcessing can repair the blurriness from camera shake.

    b) That tree is in the very centre of the photo, while part of it is cropped off by the frame, yet things got into your frame that don't help the photo any, like the bit of picnic table/bench and other tree trunk.

    Therefore I would suggest you go back in some better light, seek out the same vantage point, but then move the camera a bit further left and up so you get more of that gnarly tree that will then also be in the right vertical third of the frame. And we all get a view through that tree and the other one there onto the water.
     
  9. Cheyenne

    Cheyenne TPF Noob!

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    Thanks Lafoto I understand exactly what you mean and where you are coming from thanks again for the hints :D

    The first shot in this post has not been edited and the second has been cropped as you can see.

    There is evidence of the slight movement again in this photo and again the light was fading in this photo as would love to hear any other comments that you had on this (these) particular shot.

    Thanks in advance

    Anne

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  10. EBphotography

    EBphotography TPF Junkie!

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    These last two are a great improvement from the others. There is nothing really distracting in any part of the picture, and it does have a possible mood or theme. Go back and take it when theres more light, and if thats not possible, buy a tripod! They are very inexpensive if you just go with a basic one. Big improvement, good job!
     
  11. Cheyenne

    Cheyenne TPF Noob!

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    Thanks EB :D

    I'll definately go back and try this shot again in more light and will look into getting a tripod as landscape shots really appeal to me.

    Thanks again

    Anne
     
  12. kilifila66

    kilifila66 TPF Noob!

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    I love the last set of photos, and I am glad that you are taking the advice of people here and using it in your photography. I think the last set of photos shows a big improvement from the first set. It seems more to me on this one that you had a goal in mind when shooting this one, and it gives me a good idea of what you wanted to portray.
     

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