Newbie Picture Question - how does this happen??

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by trickytree, Nov 9, 2007.

  1. trickytree

    trickytree TPF Noob!

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    [​IMG]

    Hi all,

    I wonder if anyone can explain this effect around the bat to me??

    I thought it was motion blur, but they are in front of the bat ....

    I am aware you will need further info, but rather than swamp this post with details, I'll just answer any question.

    Thanks!!
     
  2. JDS

    JDS TPF Noob!

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    It looks like the flash was used, then the shutter stayed open for just a bit longer - that would explain the blur in front of the bat. The flash 'froze' the bat in motion, but the blur resulted from its further flight while the shutter remained open.
     
  3. Sideburns

    Sideburns TPF Noob!

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    that's exactly my guess. the flash froze the shape of the bat, but the blur is from after the flash.
     
  4. trickytree

    trickytree TPF Noob!

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    Wow!!

    Super fast response, which makes total sense to a beginner also - good job!!

    So the shutter stays open slightly longer than the flash takes to, er ... flash.

    Interesting stuff!!

    Here's all the tech info in case anyone was interested.

    It was taken last Saturday evening, as it started to get dark, and we saw the bat flittering around above us in the same route for a few mins, so I thought "why not have a go at grabbing it's pic??" After a few attempts, I caught it on it's route!!


    File Name PC040153.JPG
    Document Type JPEG Image
    File Size 3391931 bytes
    Color Model RGB
    Depth 8
    DPI Height 314
    DPI Width 314
    Orientation 1
    Pixel Height 2304
    Pixel Width 3072

    Exif Properties

    Color Space 1
    Contrast 0
    Custom Rendered 0
    Date Time Digitized 2007:12:04 17:52:26
    Date Time Original 2007:12:04 17:52:26
    Digital Zoom Ratio 1
    Exif Version 2.2.1
    Exposure Bias Value 0
    Exposure Mode 0
    Exposure Program 5
    Exposure Time 0.03333334
    Flash 25
    FlashPix Version 1.0
    FNumber 3.4
    Focal Length 6.5
    Gain Control 2
    ISO Speed Ratings 400
    Light Source 0
    Max Aperture Value 3.53
    Metering Mode 5
    Pixel X Dimension 3072
    Pixel Y Dimension 2304
    Saturation 0
    Scene Capture Type 0
    Sharpness 0
    White Balance 0

    TIFF Properties

    Date Time 2007:12:04 17:52:26
    Image Description OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
    Make OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.
    Model u760,S760
    Orientation 1
    Resolution Unit 2
    Software Version 1.0
    X Resolution 314
    Y Resolution 314
     
  5. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I can't see the photo (my firewall blocks Photobucket :( )
    But it does sound like JDS and Sideburns are correct.

    When you take a photo with flash, you are actually getting two exposures at the same time. One is the exposure from the very fast burst of light from the flash...and the other is the exposure from the ambient light. The shutter speed doesn't really affect the flash exposure, because the burst is so much faster...but a slow shutter speed may cause moving objects to blur. So in this case, your two exposures didn't line up and you ended up with a sharp bat plus some blur from the movement.

    Now, as for why the blur is in front of the bat. With most cameras & flashes, the default is for the flash ti fire at the start of the exposure. So the flash fires right when the shutter time starts. Then the bat moves and you get blur in front of the flashed exposure.

    Some cameras & flashes allow you to change this. It's called 2nd curtain or rear curtain sync. This makes the flash fire at the end of the exposure, rather than the start. This way, you get blur first, then a sharp bat ahead of the blur...which looks pretty cool, by the way.

    I'm not sure if you can set this option on your camera...check the manual.
     
  6. trickytree

    trickytree TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the info guys!!

    Loving this forum - I may be asking loads of basic newbie questions for a while.

    :hail::hail::hail:
     

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