Newbie questions & some Photos of my truck to share.

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by giorgio, Feb 9, 2009.

  1. giorgio

    giorgio TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2009
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mexico
    Hi

    I recently got interested in photography as a complement to my Webdesign business. So I bought a Nikon D80 with 18-135mm.

    I'm still learning the theory, technical terms and concepts.

    I have the 2 books of Digital Photography by Scott Kelby and I haven't yet read them all the way, just some pages here and there, but I will ofcourse, is just that his writing style and my lack of time these last days keep me from knowing what exactly I'm doing.

    These are more like questions on my mind just to let you know the doubts that I have BEFORE I sit down some more hours to study(the web and/or the books), is not necesary to answer them all, some questions have the same answer.

    So, I'm reading tutorials and some book chapters, but....

    How are we suposed to know what settings to use on the camera?.
    Like the aperture, the shutter speed, etc.?
    I understand the logic for the elements of the Exposure, but, so far I have read that first option for ISO would be 100 if possible. But what about shutter speed..?? 1/60, 1/125?... why not 1/40?

    I know why fast shutters are for moving objects and slow shutters for dark environments, and the effects you may get with it etc. according to what I have seen on books and tutorials.

    If I'm outside, at 12:30PM, cloudy, I want to take a picture to some friends..., how am I going to know what shutter speed and aperture to use?. Somehow, after hours of reading I haven't yet got it clear what numbers to use, or..., doesn't matter if I use 1/40 or 1/125 because the difference isn't noticeble?. I still have to put it on Auto or Scene.

    Is not that I have got a lot shooting already, nothing like that, at the contrary, I have just shoot out once, BTW the pics are at the end of this post, I haven't yet used Manual mode.

    Are the tutorials and books going to teach me this?.
    I know they show you some photos and the settings they used, but, I hope they teach me to naturally setup my camera on manual at any given situation, ok, I know, you get this with practice.

    After you know how exposure works...
    What book or tutorials will teach you:
    1) The theory
    2) The basic controls of your DSLR you'll need to use.
    3) From start, as a beginner, to take your camera, search for a specific subject, to know HOW to search for the optimum settings according to the situation, and shoot it. Something basic I guess.
    Some how, I know this could have to do with some Priority modes maybe?, where you want a specific setting and the camera gives you the other one. Are the priority modes the most common ways to use the camera in the "advanced" arena?
    4) Then, takes you to shoot something else while learning something new
    5) And then takes you to something else with more advanced stuff, etc. etc.

    Here are some first photos(or test photos) I took with my Nikon D80 and wanted to share with you.
    I did some Photoshop retouching.
    It was very cloudy
    If you like you don't have to comment on each one, just the ones you'd like or in general.

    1
    [​IMG]


    2
    [​IMG]

    3
    [​IMG]

    4[​IMG]

    5
    [​IMG]

    6
    [​IMG]
     
  2. chrisburke

    chrisburke TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,107
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Madoc, Ontario Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    not sure which books you got.... but if they are the ones i'm thinking, they will answer every question you have asked, you just have to read them
     
  3. JMD

    JMD TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2005
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    I really like #3.
    As for books. I just finished Bryan Peterson's "Understanding Exposure" and I think he lays out how to select shutter speeds and aperatures pretty well.
     
  4. chrisburke

    chrisburke TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,107
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Madoc, Ontario Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    ^^^ that was my guess as to the book he bought... but he hasnt told us yet..
     
  5. TamiyaGuy

    TamiyaGuy No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2007
    Messages:
    1,078
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chelmsford, UK
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I like numbers 1, 2 and 3, although in 2 and 3 I think the truck should be in the road rather than on the hard shoulder, if possible. I love your retouch of 1; the slight vignette works really well. Nice job!
     
  6. giorgio

    giorgio TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2009
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mexico
    Thank you for the responses very apreciated.

    The books I have are: The Digital Photography book Vol. 1 and 2 by Scott Kelby.
    And the "Complete Guide to the Nikon D80".
    I already started to read "Complete Guide to the Nikon D80" so I could know and understand first how the Nikon D80 works. Then I plan to read de Scott Kelby's books once I got to know my camera and technical stuff.

    But I also want to check some other books.
    Thank for the book recomendation "Understanding Exposure", seems very interesting. I do have to check the books well, as I'm more interested on Business and Executive Photagraphy, and no weddings, landscapes, animals, sports, etc.

    Thank you again

    Giorgio
     
  7. crasho

    crasho TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2008
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    If you still confused about the correct shutter speed and aperture to use you should look into your metering.
    It will help you to choose the correct amount of light to expose the photo correctly.
     

Share This Page