Night photography

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Josh220, Jan 9, 2010.

  1. Josh220

    Josh220 No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 23, 2009
    Messages:
    1,730
    Likes Received:
    83
    Location:
    California
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Last semester I took a photography class, which totally killed my desire to shoot. I decided to keep it strictly as a hobby so I can go back to enjoying it. I am back, and here is my dilemma...

    I shoot a lot of pictures of vehicles (mainly mine, but they are all Toyota 4Runners during off-road trips). I have most aspects of night photography down well, but the one area I still can't get is bright lights. Headlights, for example, always come out as big stars which ruin the shot. The only way I have been able to avoid it is by shooting with a smaller aperture or faster shutter speed, but that underexposes everything else. If I meter for something besides the lights, then they become overexposed.

    Any tips of how to capture bright lights when it's completely dark out without leaving the rest of the image underexposed?
     
  2. boogschd

    boogschd TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Messages:
    606
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    ph
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    strobe it ?

    i think they use more than 1 strobes for car photography
     
  3. Josh220

    Josh220 No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 23, 2009
    Messages:
    1,730
    Likes Received:
    83
    Location:
    California
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I thought about that but I only have one strobe currently. It's difficult because most of us have a LOT of forward facing lights. Many of them have lights on their bumper and roof. I have 2 huge ones on my bumper which are very hard to photograph at night due to the amount of light output:

    [​IMG]
     
  4. poof

    poof TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2009
    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Islamorada, FL
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    If your shutter times are long enough, you could manually strobe the lights and dial in the perfect exposure relative to the darker areas of the scene.
     
  5. bennielou

    bennielou TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Messages:
    1,798
    Likes Received:
    171
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    You SHOULD be using a three light system. (Maybe even stick in a vid light).
     

Share This Page