Nikon Coolscan LS50 35mm Film Scanner - How does it work?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by ted_smith, Feb 14, 2007.

  1. ted_smith

    ted_smith TPF Noob!

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    Hi

    I am considering purchasing the Nikon Coolscan LS50 35mm Film Scanner ( 4000 dpi ) (available from several places but retails at Amazon for £445 - [ame]http://www.amazon.co.uk/Nikon-Coolscan-LS50-35mm-Scanner/dp/B0001JZNDE[/ame])

    I figure this will be a great way of still using film and getting all the quality benefits that brings, but concurrently being able to quickly get really high quality digital copies straight into my computer. (I am considering going digital soon too, but primarily for the convenience and cost effective method of learning - at the moment it costs me a lot to learn if my prints come back over exposed etc).

    What I want to know, though, is, if I shoot a role of film, do I then simply feed the role into the scanner, or do I still need to send the film off for development and then when it come s back, I feed the negatives into the scanner? In other words, I assume the negative strips that come back from the developers have been run through the chemicals and so different to the film when it sits in it's case?

    If the former is the case, then great - in theory I can shoot a role of film and have high quality (equivalent to 28 megpixel quality) images on my PC the same day. But if it's the latter, and I still have to pay for the film to be sent off for development, that might defeat the objective.

    Thanks

    Ted
     
  2. dinodan

    dinodan TPF Noob!

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    Nikon film scanners are excellent. I have a Coolscan V ED. You definitely need to have the film processed before you can scan it!! Negative (BW or color) or positive (slide) film will work.

    I bought mine because I have lots and lots of film in my archives.

    I'm a bit confused by the Amazon listing. At the top it says LS50, but the product description says V ED. (The pic looks identical to mine.)
     
  3. ted_smith

    ted_smith TPF Noob!

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    Mmmm - I thought that would be the case. I am glad to hear that they are recommended though - the Amazon reviews seem to praise them highly, but hey - what products do Nikon produce that aren't top quality?!! :)

    Anyway, if I still have to send the films off first, that might defeat the object of my getting one. That said, I might still buy one one day (when I get the money!) when I am a better photographer for getting really good quality prints of my best images.

    As it stands at the moment, I am still learning so would probably be best spending the money on a decent flash gun or some such! Or maybe even the Nikon D80 which I have had my eye on for a while.

    Cheers

    Ted
     
  4. dinodan

    dinodan TPF Noob!

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    Here in the US (and I'm sure it's the same there), there are lots of places that can process print film in about an hour. If you tell them that you don't need prints (just the negs for scanning) it's pretty inexpensive.

    The D80 is what I use for digital shooting. You can't go wrong with that one!
     
  5. ted_smith

    ted_smith TPF Noob!

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    That's interesting - I did not realise that.

    I have just called Jessops and Peak-Imaging for a price (PI is a recommended lab for the pro or serious amatuar). Jessops charge £3.49 plus P&P, and Peak Imaging charge £3.25 plus P&P. So I'm looking at about £4.50 for just processing of the film without prints - with the prints it's about £6. Not a massive saving really...will give it some thought.

    Thanks

    Ted
     
  6. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Well, with SLR cameras (digital and film) I am a Canon person, with scanners I am a Nikon addict ;)

    Nikon film scanners are great. I scanned about 6000 35mm slides with the current LS 5000 model + a slide feeder and it was really fun. I also scanned some film strips. At least for the 5000 you can get some extra piece of hardware which allows you to run whole rolls of film straight through the scanner. I suppose that would be very convenient for you!?
     

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