Nikon d5300

Discussion in 'DSLR Video Discussion' started by Ste1986111, Mar 12, 2017.

  1. Ste1986111

    Ste1986111 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2017
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Hi

    I recently purchased a Nikon D5300 to record fitness videos for my website.

    These are instructional videos.

    I can't use manual focus as I film on my own with tripod.

    The only trouble is that th AF seems to be constantly snapping in and out of focus when I move. Also the light on the video seems to constantly change.

    Does anybody have any tips on how to record in AF mode.

    Thanks in advance


     
  2. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    40,008
    Likes Received:
    15,005
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    For decades and decades cinematographers have focused manually. The idea is to set the focus properly for the shot, and leave it there. If you're say, exercising, there's no need to constantly be readjusting the focus. In the cinema field, focus pullers are often used to manually adjust focus on shots that need focus adjustment--AF is not used.

    In consumer video cameras, AF is much better than it is in d-slr systems, but still--switching AF to OFF will ensure that the focus stays in one place, and does not ruin shots by constantly micro-adjusting as somebody does burbees or jumping jacks, or merely moves her arms as she talks.

    Light constanrtly changing is usally due to auto exposure making micro-adjustments. Again, the solution is to switch the automatic exposure system to OFF, and go with a manually set exposure, one that will stay exactly where it was placed.
     
  3. Ste1986111

    Ste1986111 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2017
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thanks for the info, I'm quite new to DSLR cameras so I will give some of your tips a try
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Messages:
    40,310
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Yep. I too recommend getting an dedicated video camera (camcorder) and a external microphone.
    Many who do use a DSLR to shoot videos that require refocusing add an accessory so the can 'follow focus' manually, rather than relying on auto focus.

    FWIW - I use an external Rode VideoMicro with a Rycote Lyre Shock Mount on the hot shoe of my DSLR when I shoot video with it.

    You might wonder why they would do that if the camera has AF?
    It's because there are 2 kinds of AF. Phase detection AF and contrast detection AF.

    For still photos most DSLRs use phase detection auto focus that requires the DSLRs main mirror be down and in front of the shutter and the image sensor behind the shutter.

    Shooting video the main mirror has to be up out of the way and the shutter has to be open so light from the lens can get to the image sensor.
    Which requires the use of the very much slower contrast detection auto focus method. Hence AF when shooting video isn't near fast enough.

    A DSLR's primary function is still photography.
    Video is a secondary function of a DSLR camera, though a video is a series of still photographs shown at 25 or so still frames per second.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2017
  5. DGMPhotography

    DGMPhotography Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2012
    Messages:
    2,696
    Likes Received:
    579
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit


    Yeah, I've found that the entry level DSLR's leave a lot to be desired when it comes to options with video. You're usually stuck with the auto settings. You'll probably get what you want with a Sony Handycam, if you're able to return the DSLR.
     

Share This Page