Nishika 3D camera image developing

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by acgoldis, Dec 5, 2008.

  1. acgoldis

    acgoldis TPF Noob!

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    Hi!

    I've got a 3D camera from Nishika with four lenses. It seems really cool. However, I'm not sure how to develop the images. Here's what I tried.

    1. I sent the roll to a place in Nevada. It was returned.
    2. I sent the roll to Snap3D in Toronto a few weeks ago. I've heard nothing from them.

    This makes me wonder if it's time to roll the dice and do something unorthodox.

    How does a 3D camera work? If my guess is right, it takes a left and right image (I noticed that I got 12 exposures out of a 24 exposure roll -- it's taking two complete images per shot). If that's the case, I can just develop them normally, get a CD with the 24 pictures on them, and then take each of the 12 pairs and use some kind of software to make stereograms or anaglyphs or something like that. The hard part is taking the left and right images, and the camera will do that -- if I can get them off the film.

    Will this work?

    Thanks in advance,

    ACG
     
  2. RacePhoto

    RacePhoto TPF Noob!

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    Not quite and No. :er:

    It takes four half frame photos, portrait. Then they slice them and reassemble the pictures behind a diffusion type plastic lens with facets on it. That's how you get the apparent 3D effect.

    Now, if you want to have them processed at a conventional lab, scanned only and print them yourself, sure thing, you'll get four half frames from each shot and you can take the two outside shots and make stereographic images from them. Mount on cardboard in the proper alignment and distance (use an old stereo photo for the location) and get an antique viewer.

    The cameras are cool. I have a Nimslo but they were designed to use three small button batteries. (Dumbest thing for such a smart idea?) I haven't held a Nishika but I think they got smart and redesigned for standard batteries, which would make it more desirable for someone who wanted to experiment.

    Here's another idea, which I just thought of at this moment. Since you are only using two of the pictures, why not put a blue filter over the inside left lens and red over the inside right lens and make some 3D glass images at the same time? :mrgreen:

    You can have the film processed, that's not the trick. It's all about what you do with it afterwards.

    If you do find a place that processes, bright colors and multiple depths work best. A line of people standing on a diagonal line, going away from the camera, looks pretty interesting.

    Landscapes without near, middle and far objects are rather bland.

    Keep in mind that you can get film for a dollar at places like Dollar General and burn a roll playing, then pay for processing to CD only. That is unless you want four prints of each of your 12 pictures for some reason? It's still expensive to play, but much cheaper than having them made into prints.

    You should be getting your pictures back from one of the two places near the US that still do this. http://www.snap3d.com/

    Now you got me started... another nice site with viewers and accessories. Cameras starting at under $20 http://www.3dstereo.com/viewmaster/cam-nis8.html
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2008
  3. sdaleb

    sdaleb TPF Noob!

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    I have a Nishika that my sister gave me about 15 years ago. I used it a few times and the effect is really cool. I haven't used it in about 10 years and am only recently looking for a place to develop. The cost advertised to develop a 36 picture roll, from which you will get 18 3d images, is 54 dollars! Yeah, very expensive. Smaller rolls are cheaper, of course. My plan is to take pictures of local kids' sport teams and sell them. I'm hoping I can charge enough to make it pay off for the uniqueness of the image. The only place I've found is www.clik3d.com out of Canada. I haven't actually sent anything to them yet and I understand it takes a long time to get your processed film back. I'm going to start taking pics today, assuming the camera still works, so hopefully in a few weeks I can let all know how it went.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2011
  4. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack TPF Noob!

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    Sadly, the webpage for clik3D.com seems to be gone; the page displayed is for a fake search engine at one of the dead-domain-grabber outfits. The only previously known US service for Nimslo/Nishika processing, Snap 3D - 3D Lenticular Prints and Cameras, is now stating on their webpage that processing for 3D film has ended, and they advise not to send in any more film. They apparently offer printing of lenticular images from scans of existing image sets; the site seems to say that this is possible, so perhaps by having the roll locally developed and scanned to CD, you might be able to supply them with an image set that could be converted to the usual 3D result. Contact them for details; I haven't asked, as I sold off my Nimslo a decade ago.

    As of this message's date, Amazon was still listing a seller with two new (and obviously old stock) Nishikas for sale - but the listing didn't reveal that the cameras are orphans for which no one-step processing service remains available.
     
  5. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    This thread was started over 4 years ago.
     

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